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Will hosts freely tell you your coin-in, theo, and other value metrics about you?

Discussion in 'Comps' started by ethanfl79, Aug 16, 2021.

  1. ethanfl79

    ethanfl79 Tourist

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    Just wondering what a host is and isn’t supposed to share with you about your play and the value your play is to the casino.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2021
  2. vegasvstr

    vegasvstr VIP Whale

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    Some will if you ask.
     
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  3. JeJas

    JeJas VIP Whale

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    Host knows everything.
    A host told me "We see everything you are doing in our casino. When you play on what machine, how much you bet, how much you win or lose."
    And he showed me the computer screen, many screens full of my activities.
     
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  4. JulianC

    JulianC Amateur

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    Even the loyalty club desk can see these stats -- and they can (and, for me, have) even tell you the exact last machine on which you played and how many points you earned from playing it (which means a lot more data points are immediately available).

    A good host will tell a player their theo and time on device/table. An even better host will also reveal the comp value (and even use the phrase "comp value").

    At some places, doing so only serves to confirm what a savvy player already knows about their play.

    I state all of the above from personal experience in the past nine months.
     
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  5. dualaces123

    dualaces123 Low-Roller

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    I've heard of hosts claiming they arent allowed to say, but I've always had hosts that were happy to tell me anything I wanted to know. To add to what @JulianC said, an 'even better' host can also give you a good idea of how close you are to various hurdles (whether that is how much more you need to play for this trip to have all of your backend charges taken care of, how close you are to the next tier of better offers, etc). It is in their best interest for you to play more, but they can make it look like it is a benefit for you.
     
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  6. dankyone

    dankyone VIP Whale

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    Some will some won’t. Many aren’t going to volunteer to explain how everything works behind the screens, and a few old school ones would rather that you know nothing about it. If you make it clear that you understand the system most of them will tell you at least the broad strokes if not the fine print.

    I strongly prefer working with hosts who know that I understand how things work and I want to know details about my theoretical losses.
     
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  7. alexm

    alexm VIP Whale

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    @dankyone is spot on. Make it clear to your host that you know what's going on, including the percentage you are expecting comped back. The first couple times you deal with your host, if they are hesitant, don't be afraid to push. The first time I ever asked for a back end comp (I was paying for everything up front including room and resort fees), I had tracked my TC earned from CET and new that over the 3 days I had around 30k coin in on video poker with what I figured was a 4% hold and about 5k coin in on slots which figured was 10%. All told a 1700 dollar theo. When I asked about back end comps the host on duty hesitated and I asked her what my coin in was. She replied with a generic response about how comps are figured and I said " I figure I had about 35k coin in on vp and 7500 on slots which should be about 2k in theo so I figure you should have about 700 bucks available to comp. At that point she had no choice but to say what my real numbers were and comped about 500 bucks which covered nearly everything.

    Hosts won't typically volunteer information that benefits the player, but as you build a relationship and demonstrate what you know, the host will be more inclined to find other players to short-comp.

    My last CET host gave me any number I ever asked for including at one point how many hours of play were done with 2 cards at the same time.
     
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  8. petevegas

    petevegas Low-Roller

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    I've had a host show me my info on the screen and also tell me my stats when i have asked
     
  9. Military Mike

    Military Mike Low-Roller

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    Is there a way to figure out what your numbers are using your win loss statements?
     
  10. Beebs17

    Beebs17 Tourist

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    Generally not. There are some casinos where the amount of tier credits earned will represent your theo and you can back into it. For example, at mlife in Vegas, tier credits divided by 30 was your theo. Therefore, 200,000 tier credits to make Platinum equaled approximately $7,000 in theo.

    Alternatively, you can look at your slot coin-in and use general rules for hold percentage and back into it, but that’s just an approximation.

    Simplest way is to ask your host or desk. I’ve never had a host say no to me, in fact most of them do it proactively after my trips.
     
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