1. Welcome to VegasMessageBoard
    It appears you are visiting our community as a guest.
    In order to view full-size images, participate in discussions, vote in polls, etc, you will need to Log in or Register.

Resort fee rip offs are nothing compared to college books

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by zoobrew, Aug 7, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Syringe Monkey

    Syringe Monkey Hero of the Baggage Carousel...

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2018
    Messages:
    1,164
    Location:
    Pittsburgh
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    6

    I did four in the Navy.... nine in the Army. My degree is highly specialized. Wouldn’t change a thing.
     
  2. dmr

    dmr Registered Abuser

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    16,198
    Location:
    Somewhere in Middle America
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    70
    Everything is high now!

    I just stopped in to the Clinique counter to get just a few things I regularly use.

    $80.00 and change!!!
     
  3. deansrobinson

    deansrobinson VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2016
    Messages:
    3,831
    Location:
    Tampa
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    9
    It's always entertaining how many people tout the merits of 'learning a trade', but want their kids sitting through freshmen orientation. The adage of 'well, college isn't for everyone' ... not real sure about that. I think, for the most part, you're better off leaning in that direction and if it doesn't pan out, the groundwork you did won't be wasted.

    And a large part of a degree is gatekeeping. We used to sort applications into two piles: degree/no-degree. Didn't matter what was on the application, either the box was checked and you moved forward or it wasn't checked and that's how the movie ended. That very same job - ten years prior - did not have a degree stipulation.

    I think the degree is the price of admission into the working world. You may not use 75% of what you study, but you have to check that box to get the interview. But, not all degrees are created equal. . .

    https://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/college/T012-S001-worst-college-majors-for-your-career-2017-2018/index.html
     
  4. DeMoN2318

    DeMoN2318 The DERS

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,447
    Location:
    Arizona
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    33
    A word of advice to your niece for future semesters. (coming from someone who spent $1000's on engineering books the first 2 years then barely spent any on books the last two years)

    Don't buy any books until needed (i.e there is a reading assignment or homework assignment from the book) the professors will often provide excerpts of the reading material or actuals scans/screenshots from the book. If a book is truly needed, find some friends and split the cost of the books, and just scan and copy the pages of the book they need. A high quality scanning printer is cheaper than most books

    It is always hard the first semester because she may not know anyone in her classes, but after this semester she should have a few classmates who will be taking all of the same classes that she will be in future semesters and they can share costs
     
  5. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    27,724
    Location:
    Here
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    110
    The numbers still show that degree/no degree leans toward the get-that-damn-degree side. But I still think the later post-war economy downplayed learning a skill or craft. Note learning, as in not getting the diploma or GED and thinking it was all done. (Yet most of us could do that w/o the choking debt of today's Gens.)

    As for the applicability of the degree itself ... excluding those in education, there aren't a ton of folks in our larger circle who are toiling where they toiled. Hell, I was supposed to be a history prof and my wife's degree is in Spanish. I'm now a serial slackard who gets paid to travel and play golf (poorly) and she's in the top-tier of public administration. So, yes, something does happen to us if we stay somewhat alert through that BA/BS (and graduate) process.
     
  6. yoyoseven

    yoyoseven Grizzled Vereran

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2012
    Messages:
    453
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    37
    Oh man, does this thread take me back.

    I worked at the campus bookstore during my collegiate days, in the textbook department. I graduated in '86, so this was a long time ago - I'm sure things have changed quite a bit since then, but here's how the "scam" worked back then:

    Every few semesters, the big publishing companies would release "new editions" of their textbooks, usually just correcting a few typos, or adding a few new illustrations or graphs. Which was totally bogus (I mean c'mon, math hasn't really changed since the Greeks figured it out a millennia or so ago). Once a new edition was released, all copies of the "old edition" were rendered worthless.

    If you were lucky, there was no new edition of the textbook you were required to purchase for a class you just finished. If so, you could sell it back at the bookstore. If you were even luckier, the same book was going to be required again the following semester. In that case, the bookstore would buy it back at 50% of the price of a new copy (and then turn around and sell it again at 75% of the price of a new copy).

    However, if the same class wasn't offered the following semester, or the professor decided to switch to a different textbook for the class, you had one more option to get a few bucks for the book you had so dearly paid at the beginning of the semester.(again, assuming there wasn't a "new edition" coming out). There were a few large outfits that sent "book buyers" around the country to buy used textbooks (which then would be sold to other university bookstores). They would set up shop at the entrance of the bookstore at the end of the semester. They always needed help, so they would pay the bookstore to have a couple of employees help them out. They handled all of the buy-backs - if the bookstore needed the book for the following semester they would pay the aforementioned 50% of the price of a new copy. If the bookstore didn't need it, then they would pay 25% of the price of a new copy. Man, people got really pissed at those guys - especially when they had bought a new copy at the beginning of the semester and then came to find out that their copy was now worthless, or worth only 25% of what they paid for it!

    I always volunteered to work with the book buyers. I would stand behind them, put the books that the bookstore wanted on rolling racks, and box up the books that the bookstore didn't need for the following semester. But here's why I always volunteered: if someone was trying to sell back a book that I knew I needed for the upcoming semester, I would offer the student a buck or two more than the book buyers were offering. Some people would refuse to sell me the book, out of spite, but it was a VERY large university that sold a LOT of books, so I knew someone else would gladly take the small premium I was offering. And, since I had intimate knowledge about most of the textbooks, and I knew the "new" edition wasn't really any different, I would buy an outdated edition back for just one or two dollars. Those two strategies saved me a ton of money over the course of four years! And, trust me, I needed the money back then - I was paying my own tuition with no grants or scholarships - I was essentially broke the entire time I spent in college. Yet, somehow, I always managed to find money for beer and other goodies (c'mon man, it was the 80's!).

    I heard a few years ago that my alma mater has gotten out of the textbook business, and now just sells trade books (commercial paperback novels and other books - like any other bookstore), snacks and other junk, and university sports team clothing and memorabilia. I'm sure that many textbooks are now e-books, but I'm also sure that publishers still charge ridiculously inflated prices for them even though their costs are a fraction of what bound paper books cost.

    Ah, the good old days.
     
  7. insin

    insin Speed Spender

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Messages:
    1,683
    Location:
    midwest
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    99
    I think the online digital books are such a scam.
    Like someone else mentioned they have a unique registration/activation code and they are non-transferable.

    The required computers and software were a budget breaker for me.
    Luckily my kiddo got a part-time job at the college book store = discount!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.