1. Welcome to VegasMessageBoard
    It appears you are visiting our community as a guest.
    In order to view full-size images, participate in discussions, vote in polls, etc, you will need to Log in or Register.

Poker For Dummies 101

Discussion in 'The Poker Room' started by StickyFingers007, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. nitc

    nitc Tourist

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    640
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    If you don't mind, I'd like to add a couple of things that could fall into the category of etiquette. I didn't see them listed before. Forgive me if I just missed them.

    Slow rolling... At the showdown, when one player waits to show his hand, as if for dramatic effect. You're not at the final table of a big TV tournament and you're not making a movie. If you win, just turn your cards over. If not, just muck your hand and let the next one start.

    Splashing the pot... Throwing your chips into the pot, allowing them to get mixed with the rest of the chips and thus not being able to tell exactly what was bet. There is plenty of room to place your chips in front of you.

    Talking out of turn... If you're not in a hand, you should not comment about that hand. Period. What you say will affect what another player does. It is not fair to the player that loses the hand, that he lost because of something said by someone that has already folded. Many rooms have this one posted as a rule.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. pokerkoo

    pokerkoo Newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    8
    What you failed to take into consideration is the pot size. When you have too many opponents calling to the river, when you do win the pot, you will win a pot that is significantly larger than if everyone was playing "correctly".

    Yes, you will lose more pots long term when you have so many players in the pot, but the pots you do win will be so much larger than they should be that those losses are easily offset in the longterm.
     
  3. Nevyn

    Nevyn VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    5,624
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    11
    you also have more control over how the pot can grow.

    NL players worry and complain about people chasing draws in limit, but what really costs them money is bluffing the same as they do in NL, and protecting hands the same way.
     
    Because oops I'm diamond
  4. marsdude

    marsdude High-Roller

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Messages:
    505
    Location:
    Colorado
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    13
    I have to admit. Probably the reason I don't like limit is because I just don't understand the strategy.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Check-Raise

    Check-Raise Low-Roller

    Joined:
    May 2, 2011
    Messages:
    381
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    5

    I think because of the opposite side of a reason you stated above, new players should play limit for fun. You wrote, "...a low limit game it is near to impossible to push other players out of the pot...". In a NL cash game, a weak player will be obvious and players will constantly be pushing them out of pots or constantly challenging them to make desicisions they are incapable of making. Therefore limit is a lot more friendly since they can draw, see hands play out and get a better feel for the game before they are broke. In NLHE one bad decision (which a newbie will always make) can cost your stack but not the case in limit.

    That's how I look at it at least.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. skinny malinky

    skinny malinky Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    171
    Basics

    I think we should talk about some of the (very) basics, since they seem to be a source of a lot of questions. It can be intimidating to walk into a poker room for the first time. It can feel like everyone knows what to do except for you. I mean, how do you even get to sit down at a table?

    Let's talk about cash games first, versus tournaments. All poker rooms have a check-in desk with someone who's a combination maitre d’ and cashier. At all but the smallest poker rooms, above the check-in desk will be some monitors with lists of names and/or initials. This is the waiting list, and it can be a little cryptic. It'll be divided into a grid, showing the different games the room has going. You'll see 1/2NLHE 100-300, 2/4LHE, 2/5/NLHE 300-500, 2/5 PLO 200-1000, etc. This tells you what kind of game each list is for. 1/2NLHE 100-300means this list is for No Limit Hold'em with blinds of 1 & 2 dollars, with a minimum buy-in of $100 and a maximum buy in of $300. 2/4 LHE is for limit hold'em, PLO is Pot Limit Omaha, O8 is Omaha hi-lo, etc. Then there will usually be some numbers under that, like 1, 3, 12, 14, etc. This shows the tables that are running that particular kind of game; each table in a poker room has a number assigned to it. Below thay maybe a list of names and/or initials; these are the people waiting for a seat in this particular kind of game.

    So you walk up and take a look at what games they have going. Most rooms will have only hold'em running, but the larger rooms such as Venetian might have a variety. You find a game you want to play. Let's say you want to play 1/2 NLHE. Stroll up to the check-in table (if you want to sound really old school, or like someone who's watched Rounders 6 too many times, you can refer to the check-in person as the brush) and say "One two no limit, please." If there's a list, they'll ask you for your name, and you can wait for an opening. You can either sit at an unused table or just kind of stand there, trying not to get in the way of the cocktail waitresses.

    Now they call your name. Go back to the check-in desk and let them know you're there and haven't wandered off. They'll tell you what table number to go to and point you in the right direction. They may ask you how much you want in chips, but often you'll wait until you're at your table. Go find your table and take whatever seat is open. The seats are numbered 1-10, with seat 1 being to the immediate left of the dealer and seat 10 to the immediate right. If you don't have chips yet, the dealer will ask you how much you want to buy in for. He may have enough chips in his tray to cover your buy in, in which case you put your money on the table like you would at any other table game and the dealer will sell you chips. Otherwise, the dealer will call for a chip runner. It may take a couple of minutes for the chip runner to come over. Hand the runner your money and she'll go off to the cashier and come back with all of your pretty, pretty chips.

    Now while you're waiting, you can get right into the game. Say you want to buy in for $200 and you need to wait for a chip runner. The dealer will announce "200 behind, seat 4," which lets everyone else at the table that you have $200 coming. She'll also ask you if you want to be dealt in, or if you want to wait for the button to pass. That means you can sit out until the dealer button goes past you. You may want to take this option so you can get a feel for the table, but if you're already in late position, it might be bad etiquette to wait.

    So now you have your chips (you can tip the runner if you want). Here are some crucial things to remember.

    1: You know how in the movies, people say "I see your $10 and raise you $20 more"? Don't do that. That's called a "string bet" and isn't allowed. If you try to do this, it will just be considered a call, not a raise.

    2: Any verbal declaration is binding. That means if you say "I want to raise" you can't change your mind. You have to raise at least whatever the minimum amount is.

    4: Actions are usually binding too. Say you take a stack of chips and put it out towards the middle of the table, but never actually let go of it. Most of the time, that's considered an action and you can't take it back. It's not like chess, where as long as your finger is still touching the piece, it's not really a move yet.

    3: Don't act out of turn. If you have the dealer button, you have to wait for everyone else to act before you make your play, be it fold, call or raise. Everyone occasionally makes a mistake on this, because they didn't see that someone else had cards or something, but don't make a habit out of it.

    There's also something called the "one-chip rule." Say you're playing 1-2 NLHE. You'll probably have a lot of $5 chips and a few $1 chips in front of you. If it's pre-flop and you want to raise to $5, you can't just put out a $5 chip without saying anything. If you just toss out that red chip silently, that will be considered a call, not a raise, and the dealer will give you $3 back in change. You have to say "raise" before you put in that chip. Of course, if you put out 2 red chips, that's a raise to $10 whether you say so or not. Now say you only have red chips, and you want to bet $8, not $10. You can say, "I bet $8" and put out two red chips. Now the dealer knows what your bet is, and you don't have to ask her for change.

    At the table, if you have any questions, ask the dealer. He can tell you how much the bet is, how much another player has in chips, etc. They've heard every question before, in more than one language, so don't hesitate to speak up if you're confused. If you think the dealer is doing something wrong, or you're having a problem that the dealer isn't addressing (say two players are speaking Swedish at the table, which is dangerous because they could be colluding, and the dealer isn't making them stop) you can ask the dealer to call for the floor person. That basically means that a supervisor will come over and make a decision on whatever the issue is. Remember, the floor person's decision is final; don't waste your time arguing with him or her.

    Those should be most of the basics. Sorry this was so damn long. If this helps, I'll give the basics of tournaments some other time.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  7. AceQueen

    AceQueen Tourist

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2011
    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Norfolk, VA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    12
    Checkout The Poker Bank videos on YouTube by SplitSuit
     
  8. Tarstarkas

    Tarstarkas Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2017
    Messages:
    437
    Location:
    Chicago but fr Boston
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Some players like the straddle bet. To me..it's like buying a bag of groceries without knowing whats in the bag. Not my cup of tea.
     
  9. KKB

    KKB VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,795
    Location:
    USA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    75
    I am a NL player (mostly tourneys, I dabble in cash)...bought in for $60 at Excal limit a few years ago...because it is a "chaser" game (because it is so cheap to chase)...I realized my KK had much lower value. I could see the straight draw & I could do nothing about it. I played about an hour & EVERY hand was like that. Now, perhaps if I went into it with an Omaha mentality (also a bit of a chaser game), I could try again. But that game was annoying AF that day...I didn't rebuy. Walked over to a stupid slot machine a friend likes to play & put in $20 in her honor...walked out with $950 15 min. later, so it wasn't a wasted trip:beer:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. KKB

    KKB VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,795
    Location:
    USA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    75
    Yeah, not my usual cup of tea either. But a couple years ago I bought into a 1/3 cash game at the Horseshoe Council Bluffs. The table informed me the button was always straddling & whoever won a hand that didn't go to showdown had to show 1 card. I asked if I could play an orbit before agreeing to their conditions & they agreed (which they had to anyway but whatever...etiquette). After an orbit it added a bit of fun so I joined. The best part was I ALWAYS showed my crap card at showdown which drove them CRAZY. (especially from a woman at a table of guys...:p)
     
  11. LuckyDuckyDan

    LuckyDuckyDan Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    136
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    40
    Straddling just raises the stakes of the game to the next stakes level. A 1/2 NL game becomes a 2/4 NL game. For passive tables playing with a lot of scared money, it becomes an easy way to pick off targets for $25 rather than $12-15 on flops that don't hit.