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Opinion: What Decade Had the Best Music?

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by spdandpwr, Jul 31, 2019.

  1. bdautch

    bdautch VIP Whale

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    Plus, the 20's got the party started with those hot flappers gettin' all riled up. Add in a line of coke snorted with a $100 bill, and you got yourself a party. Man, what I wouldn't give to rage with Cole Porter and F. Scott Fitzgerald before anyone else had heard of the French Riviera.
     
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  2. Bogus Bill

    Bogus Bill Newbie

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    The 40s by far. You could understand the lyrics and dance to the music.

    P.S.: Springsteen is an overrated, incoherent, mush-mouthed hack. Same goes for Dylan.
     
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  3. progrocker2112

    progrocker2112 Watch out for this guy

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    Now is always the best time for music. In a few days (when it comes out) I'll be able to play Tool's new album followed by Rush's Caress of Steel followed by Moonlight Sonata if I had the mood for that combo. People get stuck in certain eras or genres because they stop looking, not because there is no new good music being made...and there's nothing wrong with that. Listen to (and drink) what you like.
     
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  4. pressitagain

    pressitagain High-Roller

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    Each decade influences the next. It’s almost impossible to pick the best.

    If I had to predict the most influential... I would say the 80s. Everything from disco to funk to rap. 80s started house music which finally transformed into today’s edm.

    But I love it all!!!
     
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  5. johnvic

    johnvic VIP Whale

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    1820's when Beethoven wrote the 9th. That piece alone surpasses everything else ever written.
     
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  6. Gino

    Gino "The King of Inappropriate."

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    1950's-1970's...

    Everything else is shite.
     
    Reno to Las Vegas...and other places in between..
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  7. woodsie

    woodsie VIP Whale

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    I think you misunderstand my post greatly. I absolutely understand WHY revenues increased and then decreased. I was in the industry for more than a decade from 2000 onward. First in a touring band and then working at a record label scouting and signing new artists. I had a front row seat to the digital music paradigm shift and left the business because of it.

    My post wasn't explaining the data but rather what the data explains. In other terms, the wide breadth of popular music in the 90s didn't beget the revenue boom but rather the revenue boom begot the wide breadth of popular music.

    I'm saying that the popularity of the highly profitable CD format ENABLED the industry to take more risks on more diverse sounds and that is what made the 90s a great decade for music.

    So by extension going forward and addressing your point on piracy, my argument would say that piracy reduced revenues which in turn reduced the breadth of music that the recording industry would be willing to invest in which in turn narrows the breadth of music which makes it to the mainstream.

    When I was in the industry, the accepted rate of success of a new band/album was about 1 in 7. That means that for every album which got past broke even and made a profit for the label, you'd have six that didn't. My margins on a typical compact disc were around $5-$8 per unit so once you got past the break even point, you were making a lot of money. The fact that we were willing to accept a 1 in 7 shot is illustrative of the risk that we were willing to accept on a new project given the potential pay off.

    Piracy aside, another change that happened was the subscription/revenue sharing based model. The revenues available from that type of distribution model were a mere fraction of what we used to get from physical discs or even digital downloads. We got fractions of a cent per play from those services compared to $6-$9 we'd get from the distributor for a compact disc or digital download (iTunes). The amount of plays we'd get for our most popular albums/songs never amounted to anything that compared to selling that same music as outright to the consumer. It wasn't even close.
     
  8. JosieCat

    JosieCat VIP Whale

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    Agree with many - 70's - early 80's - with the exception of Chevy Van and Afternoon Delight.
     
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  9. Roccoscollar

    Roccoscollar High-Roller

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    70s

    though I was big into grunge era early 90s but you can't beat the catalog of the 70s
     
  10. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    "Do the Hustle," #1 song in America 44 years ago this week. Special. lol
     
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  11. Valgal

    Valgal VIP Whale

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    Agree with all who said late 60s through the 70s.
     
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  12. bobby jones

    bobby jones VIP Whale

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    It is whatever decade encompassed your 15-25 age range. Same with sports and same with fashion (unless you were that age in the 70's of course).

    I'm an 80's gen x guy with depression/war era parents and boomers as sibblings. Parents played jazz and swing, brother and sisters played 60's and 70's rock and I got caught up in Brit pop. Nothing better than a mixed cassette with Glenn Miller, The Beatles and Simple Minds!
     
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  13. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    My parents' influence on me was folk. Lots of folk. Still on my play list. My sister is five years older so she was the conduit for late '60s/early '70s rock.
     
  14. SMG

    SMG High-Roller

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    I think for a lot of us, the decade or two when we were in grade school and high school tend to become our favorites. For me it's, the '60s and '70s, although there are some good tunes from all of the earlier decades that I like, as well from the '80s through the present.
     
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  15. Chuck2009x

    Chuck2009x VIP Whale

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    I wouldn't necessarily say "best," but 80's definitely seemed more fun than 60's 70's or 90's.

    There's lots of popular notorious absolute shit in every decade, any piece of shit you want to name from the 80's, I can match with one from the 60's 70's or 90's.
     
  16. alanleroy

    alanleroy Click my avatar

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    Au contraire mon ami... [​IMG]
     
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  17. bdautch

    bdautch VIP Whale

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    "In the 1813 campaign, Ludwig secured an All-Star appearance with his clutch 'Wellington's Victory' against the Paris Napoleons and his 'Seventh Symphony', the allegretto of which made him a lock for Most Valuable Composer"
     
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  18. deansrobinson

    deansrobinson VIP Whale

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    I think my answer has more to do with the relevance of music in my life as to what I consider "best". I was born in '60, so my awareness of music probably runs from around '73 to '85, or so. So my 'best era' would run from mid-seventies to mid-eighties (assuming we have hard lines of demarcation). I will say that once I turned thirty, music had pretty much lost its importance (compared to high school) and was now relegated to 'background'. However, when we consider awareness, I developed a liking for music that was 'before my time'...the 60's. Something I never embraced was disco music. If I had to choose between listening to disco and that homespun hokum that I grew up with, well, mamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys...

    Now? A lot of stuff that never made it to commercial radio. Eclectic mix.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2019
  19. mescalita

    mescalita old and in the way...

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    But tell us how you really feel, Bill...
     
  20. parallax

    parallax Low-Roller

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    I was a teenager during the 1980s and I have a fondness for some of the music, especially new wave, rap and alternative music. However, one forgets how much crap there was on the airwaves. There was a lot of bad music. From 1987-1990, it was a vast wasteland. It is not surprising that rap and grunge came and basically pushed most of the 1980s musical acts out the door. I tend to like genres or specific bands rather than state I like a particular era.
     
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