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Desktop PC with a SSD

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by BlueBellThunder, Feb 15, 2020.

  1. BlueBellThunder

    BlueBellThunder VIP Whale

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    Good morning VMB, I’m looking for a desktop PC with an SSD. I don’t need a gaming machine, but I do want something fast. I’m looking at a a Dell for $599 that fits my needs, but before I pull the trigger I wanted to know if anyone has better options.

    Thanks.
     
  2. pultzar

    pultzar Low-Roller

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    Post a link for what your looking at from Dell.
     
  3. BlueBellThunder

    BlueBellThunder VIP Whale

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  4. Pancakes

    Pancakes Low-Roller

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    I've not bought a pre-built PC for years so I can't comment on price/value, but I have to say having an SSD is the BEST upgrade you can do imho - the difference in speed over a traditional HDD is remarkable, plus it's silent!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  5. Turtleman

    Turtleman VIP Whale

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    Can't offer advice without knowing more, but I'm a big fan of Micro Center's computers and see there are four stores in NY and one in NJ. I used to assemble my own machines, but bought the last one 2 years ago for less than the parts would have cost. I definitely agree that SSD is the only way to go for the main drive, while HDD's are still fine for bulk storage.
     
  6. pultzar

    pultzar Low-Roller

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  7. runningonthehub

    runningonthehub High-Roller

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    I agree about Micro Center. I bought a Power Spec last year and love it. I have had computers since 1998 and this Power Spec is the best I have ever had. I use to buy my computers custom made from Cyberpower. But I decided i did not need a $1K model anymore. The Power Spec only cost $800 and it is all I will ever need at my age. Today you can get a lot of computer for not a lot of money.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
  8. runningonthehub

    runningonthehub High-Roller

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    What is size of the SSD? Am I missing that?
     
  9. runningonthehub

    runningonthehub High-Roller

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  10. runningonthehub

    runningonthehub High-Roller

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    One thing for sure. Going from a ten year old computer to a modern computer will be like going from a model T to a Ferrari. If you are not a gamer, that computer could be all you need.
     
  11. pultzar

    pultzar Low-Roller

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    Radeon R5
     
  12. Turtleman

    Turtleman VIP Whale

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    The Power Spec's SSD is 500GB, as is the SSD upgrade on the machine I built. I find that's the perfect size and can't see ever filling up more than half. I installed 1TB and 2TB HDD's for videos and backups, and also use a couple external HDD's.

    My SSD's use SATA interfaces (M2 on the Power Spec), while the latest and greatest machines use M2, NVMe SSD's. It can be a bit confusing, but go for the NVMe type if at all possible.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
  13. mikeinctown

    mikeinctown High-Roller

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    Whatever you get, an SSD, PCIe, or an NVME drive, get at least 500gb and then purchase a second drive as a backup and install in the computer. The NVMe is the absolute fastest thing out there nd your computer will completely boot in 8 seconds or less.
     
  14. Film-Noir

    Film-Noir High-Roller

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    SSD are amazing,

    Layman simple explanation:
    Conventional hard drives, imagine a record player, with a needle (looking for part of a song)=your data
    looking for data sectors & the needle dropping up & down looking for your data
    That's a conventional hard disk drive.

    SSD"s access your data in Physical memory (yes chips)
    no spin up on a platter of a regular drive, sector searching etc.
    + now their prices are very affordable.
     
  15. FullBoat

    FullBoat VIP Whale

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    You'll never regret getting a SSD boot drive. It's like night and day. m2 is even faster, and NVMe is faster still. But, the price does go up of course. If you're just looking for a fast PC, any SSD is better than an old platter disk. What you might look into is getting a smaller SSD(250gig) and adding on a larger HD for storage/programs. That way your boot is really quick, and you have plenty of storage space.
     
  16. DaiLun

    DaiLun R.C., L.C., and A.A.N.G.

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    If all you want is speed at boot up, then you don't need a 1TB SSD. A 256GB main drive and larger conventional HDDs for storage would be the less expensive way to go.

    I realize that I am very much "outside the norm" in my computing requirements, having 16TB of networked storage and another 8TB of local storage in my house. It takes about 30 seconds to boot up any of the systems in my house using SSD.
     
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  17. BlueBellThunder

    BlueBellThunder VIP Whale

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    That’s exactly what I’m looking at. It’s not just boot up speed, once my pc is running it’s still slower then when it was new, and I have gig speed. The pc is over 10 years old, so it’s time for a new one.
     
  18. Kobra2848

    Kobra2848 VIP Whale

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    I purchased a HP Pavilion desktop before Christmas from Wally World for 400 bucks that rocks. It has a 256GB SSD and is considered a gaming desktop since it has a GTX 1660 video card. All I know is that it rocks. Boots up before I can get seated and is fast.

    Mark
     
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