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Cyclists - Bike show and tell - show off your gear!

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by Mitkraft, Jul 10, 2019.

  1. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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    Must be. It looks from the picture as if he could put his feet flat on the ground while sitting on the seat and still have his knees bent. There is some serious perspective shenanigans going on there! :D
     
  2. hammie

    hammie VIP Whale

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    I was thinking the same thing. If you look at recreational bikers, most of them are on frames that are too small.
     
  3. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    That's because most kinda-cyclists are on department store/big-box bikes, and manus build them way small and there is paranoia over standover height and folks selling Remingtons, Mizuno ball gloves and bikes aren't trained.

    I'm more at the enthusiast level and I seem to tower over my bike. Now some of that is due to modern compact geometries. But it fits. Mostly. (Still chasing cockpit fit.)
     
  4. SMG

    SMG High-Roller

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    I still have my old Trek Fuel 100 mountain bike that I purchased new ca. 2003. I use to ride a lot back in my younger days, mainly for exercise and for the fun of it. Although, I don't ride as much nowadays. I had a less expensive Trek hardtail before upgrading to this one. My first bike that I could afford to buy when I was a kid was one of those Schwinn Stingrays with the banana seat and high rise handle bars. LOL

    Anyways, the Trek Fuel 100 has been pretty reliable over the years and I've only had to replace/rebuild components as they've worn out, as well as replacing the front suspension fork once. If I were riding more, I would probably buy a new model, but this one still rides good and serves my needs.

    Trek1.jpg Trek2.jpg
     
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  5. calcuttaman

    calcuttaman Low-Roller

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    When I read this thread I couldn't wait to go get a photo of my bike!
    Schwinn Sidewinder circa 2005!
    IMG_2314.JPG
     
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  6. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    Ahh, Schwinn. Junior Stingray was my first memorable bike.

    Great Schwinn story ... a few years back we were in Chico riding the Wildflower. Two guys did the century, with 5,000' of climbing, on original Schwinn Krates. You know, the small front wheel, rear slick, long-handled five-speed shifter on the top tube between your legs, riser bars. THAT was animal!!!
     
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  7. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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    You guys with older bikes and 26ers are making me all nostalgic. Here is the FS 26er I rebuilt for my little brother last year. It was handed down to me and was my primary bike for a while till I built my 29er. It's a 2001 Diamondback and when I rebuilt it for my brother I slightly upgraded the drive train, converted to mechanical disk brakes (since it had mounts) and decked it out with some orange accents. The bottle cage and coil spring were just done with orange Plastidip which works great except that the Plastidip is rubberized and holds the water bottle maybe a little too well. He swapped it to the lower cage though and all is good. I kinda missed it after rebuilding it and giving it to him. Some trails are a little better suited to the smaller 26er than my tank of a 29er but man does he bitch and complain when I lead him through tall grass..lol

    2018-11-10 11.50.44.jpg
     
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  8. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    Looks like Frankenbike, and I mean that lovingly!!
     
  9. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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    That’s pretty funny since aside from the orange accents which are only different in color it’s visually pretty much what it looked like stock.
     
  10. hammie

    hammie VIP Whale

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    You mean like this?
    C08687A0-0BB3-41F1-8D6C-97AB22A6436F.jpeg
     
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  11. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    Yep. Two guys. Two of those. 100 miles. 5,000' of climbing. Banana seats and all.
     
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  12. JosieCat

    JosieCat VIP Whale

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    Casual rider. Recently moved 2.2 miles away from work so I bike in when I can.


    6C362752-C667-405E-9273-CEDAD5116C99.jpeg
     
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  13. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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  14. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    My LBS hosts several rides each week. Most go out at B through C+/D levels and distances/elevations. Wednesday morns it's 18-30 miles depending on time of year, with a B pace. They're no-drop but most of the time it's riders who don't need to regroup. We're moving the start to 6am starting next week so we can up the mileage but mostly beat the valley heat. This was yesterday's ride:

    https://ridewithgps.com/trips/37064726

    There's also a 30+ mile C/C+ ride at dawn on Tuesday and a two- to three-tier ride on Saturdays depending on who shows up. We ride (I'm a B) 35-50 miles averaging 14, and they are flat to maybe 1,000' of climbing; hey we live in one of the largest valleys in the states, though the animals head up toward or into the Sierra. The C and often D field goes 45-60 with several thousand feet of climbing. And then here and there on the calendar are "special" rides to honor favored routes of the group or those who've left us.

    I'm not sure what's going to happen this winter, but the shop -- and let me give a HUGE shoutout to the owners and all at Sunnyside Bicycles, who truly put their feet, seats and money into the community, and not just the community of riders -- uses the cooler months to advocate and assist A riders. They host seminars on everything from fueling and hydration to road etiquette and riding in a group, plus rides for the newest newbies and those trying to transition to the next level. And all of these rides has a leader from the shop, either an owner or an employee (who is paid for his/her time), or a trusted long-time customer/group rider. This shop really cares. (When she recently couldn't lead owing to an Achilles problem, one of the co-owners still came out and drove SAG.)

    These are amazingly collegial groups and folks have known each other and been riding together for a very long time.

    I've largely quit going with the Monday group in another nearby town and I'm trying to get in several hours on my own now. I'm admittedly not a good self-starter -- just look at my waist line -- and I hear voices when riding solo. (OK, not really, but hopefully you know what I mean.) But I need to up my mileage and endurance so need this third ride weekly. (Owing to the demands of work, my wife's rides have fallen off nearly totally. Though we are getting out for an hour on Sunday's now.) We have a new friend up here who is a fitness freak and getting into cycling, so I'm trying to get her out on Mondays. But she's still in that mode of being deathly afraid out on what she calls our "narrow farm roads." Come on now, most of 'em are paved. lol
     
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  15. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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    We have a similar situation here with a cycling club I recently joined who are affiliated with our local Bike Barn. They have group rides almost every day (lots of retired folks) and the ride speeds vary with some of them touted as 23+ mph (don't think I could hang with those guys). I've only ridden with the group a couple of times but I always enjoy the challenge when I do.

    For any new rider or those looking to get out more I recommend seeking out groups like this. They can be so awesome for learning, being challenged or motivated, and just finding a group to ride with and learn some routes from. I confess that I'm a bit of a loner and do most of my riding solo because sometimes I don't dig the stress and concentration of riding in a pace line, but the comradery is certainly awesome.
     
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  16. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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    Here is my other mountain bike. It was actually my first full frame up rebuild. About a year and a half ago I was out riding the Diamondback I posted above I noticed a beat up bike tossed in the ditch. It was missing the seat/post, grips, one crank, had a broken shifter and was spray painted pretty poorly. Upon inspection I noticed it was full suspension, had disc breaks and seemed to be a larger frame bike which attracted me because my Diamondback was a little small for me. I came back in my truck and picked it up. I was able to deduce that it was a Mongoose XR-Pro and was initially disappointed because the first site my searches brought me to was pretty negative on the bike because it's actually a Walmart bike. But further reading lead me to bigboxbikes.com and wealth of information about that specific bike because it had quite a following as a surprisingly capable bike for a big box store and was a great platform for upgrading. I ended up completely disassembling, cleaning and removing the spray paint, and rebuilding the whole thing with some of its original parts and some parts on hand. I've since upgraded and swapped out to the point that only the frame itself is original. Most of the parts were picked up as part of bundled lots on craigslist and facebook. Originally I'd set it up with an older Shimano XTR 3x9 speed drive train which I got in a bundle and then later learned that the derailleur would run 10 speeds if paired with road shifters (10 speed mountain shifters have a different pull ratio).

    2019-05-25 11.23.08.jpg 2019-05-25 12.06.17.jpg 2019-05-25 12.06.11.jpg
     
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  17. Richard Alpert

    Richard Alpert LOST

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    I roll on a Wal-mart clearance Mongoose.
    Pimped it out with the horn and bell.

    DSC01370.JPG

    I took a similar bike on a solo ride across Wisconsin a handful of years ago. That bike had a blue horn.

    RICHARD
     
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  18. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    One of the things -- and this might strike some as counterintuitive -- that helped my wife feel comfortable with riding in general was doing a fundraiser/charitable group event pretty early on. (It also helped when we got her off a drop-bar roader, a K2 with cleated pedals, and onto an upright Electra with a full drive-train; it wasn't a cruiser, per se. From there she went to the flat-bar carbon endurance bike I mentioned above.) This did several things for her. 1) She saw that riders take all forms and come in all shapes, sizes and abilities. That is key for everyone and also the reason why, sorry world, I immediately adopted lycra. 2) It was a supported event, so that added a level of comfort. 3) Though not a massively attended event and riders quickly spaced out, she could see others on the road, so she didn't feel alone or isolated, and she got the hang for passing and being passed. 4) She simply thought it was fun, with the group start and the bands playing and the finish line and the swag. We've done a lot of events since then ... and it is for charity.

    Circumstances don't allow her to ride many of these now, but we still have some that are essentially evergreen. We missed Chico the past two years but we did that three years running. This winter will be her fourth or fifth Tour de Palm Springs. We're going back to that first event in October. It looks like we'll have quite a few friends joining us in the desert for that one, too, which is always fun. We get a nice getaway weekend in a great part of the world and on Saturday we'll fan out riding distances that are comfortable for each -- 15, 35 or metric -- then when it's over meet up for the beer garden and after-ride fun. And she tries to make one of the several other events that I sprinkle through my calendar.

    I know a guy who always asks: "Why do you spend 50 or 75 or 100 bucks to do a ride when you can just ride for free?" Folks either get it or they don't.

    We also almost always take our bikes with us when doing a driving trip. Or if she's only flying in for part, we'll rent for her.

    And let me echo Mit's echo: Find your local bike club(s) or LBS club(s) and join in. It's safer, easier and more fun getting into this racket or improving in this racket with guidance, support and advice.
     
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  19. Mitkraft

    Mitkraft VIP Whale

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    A horn AND a bell, you're a madman!! Love the Mongoose logo on the top tube. I'm old enough to remember when mongoose was the bomb! I remember in 4th grade when my buddy around the block got a Mongoose with free-wheel so you could back pedal and handlebars that would spin 360 degrees with Oakley-3 grips...man was I jealous! But his dad worked at NASA so "he was rich"...lol!

     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
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  20. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    I can't find my bell. Took it off when I changed bars and now it is somewhere in the midden that is my office. Spurcycle. Awesome bells. Almost unnoticeable in black on black bars.

    One thing I'm getting. A dog whistle. Being in the sticks we have rogue Cujos all over the place. And it's the little ratty ones that are the worst. One goes into your wheel it is goodbye vermin, but you also go over your bars.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
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