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A change in Vegas Target Demographics? For all you Vegas Veterans

Discussion in 'Misc. Vegas Chat' started by Multifarious5, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. Eric1285

    Eric1285 Low-Roller

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    Pretty sure I'm a product of the initial 90's family destination push, although we probably would have gone even without the campaign.

    I'd say this is a smart strategy to help create the next generation of Vegas lovers, but few corporations strategize beyond next quarter so it's more likely they think this is something that can help now.
     
  2. 44inarow

    44inarow VIP Whale

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    I have a feeling some of it is related to the diversification of revenue sources. Back in the 90s, I always got the sense that the push was, "Come to Vegas to gamble and bring your family along", whereas now it's more "Come to Vegas and spend money on restaurants and attractions with your family".

    Ha, that happens to me even in 2019. There are a handful of places I frequent where they will literally not take tips from me -- there's one restaurant I go to where they zero-out the tip on the check before they give it to me. I have to go back when the people I know aren't working so I can get tips into the pool.
     
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  3. drac999

    drac999 High-Roller

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    I never tipped my host - didn't have a clue I should! I did tip everyone else - limo driver, housekeeper, dealers, CW's, etc. etc.
     
  4. SMG

    SMG High-Roller

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    History often repeats itself because as the younger generations start taking over, they rarely learn from mistakes made by prior generations. I doubt that Vegas will ever be completely family friendly, but the younger generation of bean counters probably believe this is another way of making more $$$$ from the masses. My guess is that they probably think that they can target some of the Disneyland/Disney World crowd who often spend thousands of dollars when they take their families to these mega-theme parks.

    I only go back as as 2000 which is about the time when their "family friendly" experiment seemed to be going downhill, but even back then, comps were a lot better and easier to achieve than today. Needless to say, no crazy resort fees, concession fees and whatnot back then too.
     
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  5. bobby jones

    bobby jones VIP Whale

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    I remember reading Steve Cyr’s book where made a point that hosts essentially ignored slot players. I guess before players cards, slot play was difficult to track. One of his things was watching “the little ole ladies” on the slots and discovering a gold mine.

    I would be curious to see difference in slots vs tables comps over the years
     
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  6. Gino

    Gino "The King of Inappropriate."

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    I was pretty poor back in the 1990's and comps, even for a low LOW roller, were much looser than they are now.

    Particularly with food.. Rooms and limos were easily attained. Gamblers were much more appreciated and taken care of.

    Hosts were more than just bean counters reading you a spreadsheet about your theo and tier status, they got shit done for the players.

    .....but, there were screaming fucking kids all over the place, particularly at the themed places, it was a nightmare in that aspect.

    i miss the comps, but not the kids.
     
    Reno to Las Vegas...and other places in between..
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  7. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    Whoa!!! LVFritz. You’re not just some ghost?!?
     
  8. dankyone

    dankyone VIP Whale

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    The comp systems in the 90s were much more opaque, no points or tier levels—or even “offers” as we know them today. There was no internet booking. If you had a host, you would call him up, and he would “book you in” at casino rate, room comp, RFL, or RFB. If you had enough play to cover RFB you could start moving into suites. A room was ALWAYS available for players, even if you called on a Saturday afternoon for a reservation that night.

    If your play on a particular trip didn’t cover what the host booked you into—you got less upfront on the next trip.

    IIRC they wanted $100/hand for 4 hours for a room comp at the Mirage and $200/hand for RFB. This is when it was the top hotel in town. When Bellagio opened in 1998 they wanted $250/hand for RFB...and that included the likes of Picasso and Le Cirque.

    There was a lot of wiggle room for back end comps if your host liked you and/or you were a frequent visitor. Upfront comps were heavily dependent on how you played the last trip.
     
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  9. Sonya

    Sonya Queen of VMB

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    This is how I feel about traveling with my husband. :haha:

    Things were all generally a lot less expensive. Rooms for under $60 were common and there weren't resort fees to inflate those prices. I, like Gino, was pretty broke in the 90's, but I regularly got free nights Sun-Thu at a few properties. You also could play the tables for an hour or so and easily get a buffet comp just for asking. I also agree it was more discretionary from the pit boss. Nobody ever sent me to the slot club to get a comp. They just wrote one up in the pit.
     
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  10. drac999

    drac999 High-Roller

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    I forgot that Sonya! At the end of the night, I would always ask the pit boss for a comp for breakfast. He only asked, "Where do you want to eat?".
     
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  11. bubbakitty

    bubbakitty Doing retirement again and happily so....

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    The 90’s. We were so dumb. We loved the horseshoe and Lady Luck. We flew America west. Paid for our rooms and got “mostly comped” on BJ and craps (at the time a $ pass line and 5/6 odds behind). If not comped there were plenty of 2.49$ breakfasts if you wanted to overspend. Coffee was usually more than the breakfast advertised. I found it way more fun without all the hoops. And that ringmaster, damn the ringmaster. (similar to god-d^*n the pusher man)
     
    The tax man cometh and i goeth.
    Spontaneous trip; what can I say.
  12. GlobalRoamer333

    GlobalRoamer333 Tourist

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    I think you've asked a really interesting question here.
    In my humble opinion, there are a number of angles really.

    Firstly, I think it's human nature that we all tend to romanticise the past. Probably the Vegas visitors of the 1960s felt it was better back when they used to visit back in the 1950s (and possibly it was too), and this trend continues every decade, and so on and so forth.

    I do remember the focus on Vegas as a family destination during the 1990s during 2 trips I took, and that this came along with the simultaneous corporatisation of Vegas. This corporatisation (concentration of ownership) has only increased in the past few decades since then. I guess, ultimately, many Casino operations in Vegas are a modern professional business, who are often part of large globalised companies now, and must also answer to shareholders etc. So they will do whatever they have to, to attract the various groups that they feel they need, in order to thrive financially. A lot of pension funds of hard working men and women are invested in some of these companies, and I want them to do well (I tell myself this reassuringly in the Uber, when I lose my daily budget and am on the way back to my hotel, LOL!)

    The other aspect though, re: comps, is the increasing wealth that most of us are lucky to have, when compared to our parents generation. And our parents, were of course (thankfully) mostly better off than their parents generation, etc...etc... In that regard, Casinos are probably also facing a much higher percentage of customers who want or expect comps. The growth of this percentage of customers, has probably outstripped the growth in available rooms. i.e. a casino built 20 years ago is probably basically the same size now as it was then, even though there are more customers coming to Vegas (population growth), and also a larger percentage of those customers probably have decent earnings. So a lot of the tightening of comps, is probably related to a lot of these demographic changes and market forces as well.

    As to what we can do, I think we can just continue to be happy and grateful that we are alive and generally healthy and can afford to go to Vegas and gamble, and just enjoy it in our own preferred ways as best we can. Luckily there is enough variety in Vegas still to be able to generally satisfy most of the types of customers who want to come, and the types of trips that they want to take.

    Thanks a lot for your really interesting forum question (and to the replies) all of which I really enjoyed reading. All the best :)
     
  13. azlew

    azlew Low-Roller

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    Yes turn Vegas into kiddyland and watch all of seasoned players just stay home and hit the indian casinos .
     
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  14. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    Someone correct me here. Didn't Vegas go "kiddyland" in the '90s seasoned players did not stay away? In fact, isn't there a thread here extolling the virtues of the comp policies in the '90s when Vegas had gone down this path?

    It's a phase IF it is even acted upon in a significant manner. A few photos of some families sure has folks freaking out. WHEN they put all the kid attractions back in then maybe it would be time to rush the bulwarks.
     
  15. tee6395

    tee6395 Downtown Dreamer

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    There's room for everybody, but I certainly won't be patronizing places that cater to children. I try to avoid them at all costs. The only place where I shudder when I see kids is downtown. I certainly wouldn't want my children (of which I have zero) to be exposed to what lies beneath the canopy!
     
  16. ken2v

    ken2v Wish I was in Bend

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    Our society has decided that wrapping children in bubble wrap and handing out the same trophy whether you finish first or last is a wise course of action, and that can't exactly be called a stellar bit of evolution. Maybe Vegas is exactly what kids need!!!
     
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  17. Jackpot Johnny

    Jackpot Johnny Wynn Fan

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    Ah, yes, but it just begins with the two pictures and pretty soon the little scourges are everywhere.

    I remember the last time-a few enterprising families fell for the marketing and actually came all together with children under twelve. A great sadness and disappointment washed over me.
     
  18. pressitagain

    pressitagain VIP Whale

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    “The VEGAS gambler” is a dwindling species.

    All of these casinos know that. Vegas as a city recognizes that.

    The gimmicks are what they need....to draw in people in general. A short time ago, Vegas had the hottest club scene. They’ve brought back the speak easy to compensate.

    Families? It doesn’t bother me having brought my two daughters once. Other than being at the pool and eating at some restaurants. They don’t know what Vegas is....like the rest of us.

    A diverse economy is what they are doing....it”s not costing me more for any of this diversification....bring it on!!!
     
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  19. iamsomedude

    iamsomedude High-Roller

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    I feel like MLife (and the Vegas hotel industry as a whole) understands that it can't rely on gaming to sustain itself (see: China crackdown on corrupt businessmen that would typically go to Vegas to gamble, local casinos lessening the need for Vegas to scratch the gambling itch, younger generations possibly not being as keen to gamble as earlier generations, etc.), so it's trying to diversify its portfolio by projecting itself as family friendly.

    They way I look at it is, MLife knows it can draw in more of the domestic market with attractions such as the new Raiders team, T-Mobile Arena events, and the Golden Knights, and the people drawn in will sometimes include their families in their trips. No one in their right mind truly believes that the remaining husks of the family-friendly 90's are going to keep kids satiated for long, and I don't think MLife really believes that either. However, I think they're preemptively trying to build some brand familiarity for people booking rooms on their website, in the same way that TV ads do. The eSports arena at the Luxor is likely one of their forays into building a more kid-friendly environment, without having to completely tear apart their existing hotels. I would also not be surprised to see Mandalay Bay hosting more eSports tournaments (Fortnite, Apex Legends, League of Legends, etc.) than just the EVO fighting game tournament in the near future, which could be an additional draw for kids.

    As far as how MLife is going to make money, with the draw from rabid sports-goers and concert-goers, I believe their strategy for families may be something like this:
    • Continue showing low prices on booking websites, but keeping resort fees high
    • Continue charging extra for roller beds (since families tend to stay in the same room)
    • Continue charging for parking
    • Nickle and dime on amenities
    • Build more food court-like and casual dining options (with Vegas prices) like Eataly, where families can get in and get out easily without having to worry about dress codes
     
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