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Wynncore Poker Room

Discussion in 'The Poker Room' started by scc31, Jun 25, 2015.

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  1. scc31

    scc31 Low-Roller

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    So I had another thread about this that I wanted to bump. But while I found some useful fact. I just want to ask what peoples experiences with the Wynncore Poker? I'm planning on playing one of the nights there just buy-in $200 or so and play for an hour or 2. (Short 3 days 2 night trip with the GF)

    My question is, is this a fair amount? I know Wynncore is generally higher rollers. Are there limits? NL tables? Antes? Not entirely sure how it is to play in person especially if I plan on hoping to win some and then bounce (IE: If I'm up 100-200, I'm probably going to run) Is that frowned upon? And If I buy in for like $200 and somebody has a bank roll of $10,000 across me and just goes all in am I most likely screwed at a disadvantage? What should I expect in terms of binds and antes for non-tourney. games

    Thanks!
     
  2. mrstealth

    mrstealth High-Roller

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    With a $200 bankroll you are choosing the wrong room to short stack. With that bankroll better to walk across to the Mirage or down to Harrahs or Flamingo where there are lower limit, and "capped" no limit buy in games.

    And yes, "Hitting and running" is frowned upon, and poor etiquette in any poker room.

    There is an old saying amongst gamblers "Scared Money Never Wins".
     
  3. elrohir44

    elrohir44 Low-Roller

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    Wynn's lowest game is 1-3 no-limit hold-em. They don't get limit games running there anymore sadly. $200 is fine to buy in with, especially if you are inexperienced. The minimum is probably $100, but not sure. There are no antes.

    There is nothing wrong with hitting and running in a poker room, especially since you are short-buying, although some of the players may grumble about it.

    If your stack is $200 and the other guy has $10,000 and goes all in, you are only in for $200. It's not like in the movies where people are able to throw their watch or house deed on the table to call a giant bet. Poker doesn't work that way in real life. You can only lose what is in front of you at the start of the hand. As far as I know there is a maximum buy-in at the lower-stake tables at Wynn, so you will never see someone with more than a couple thousand $ anyway.

    As for tips on playing live poker for a first timer, it typically goes like so:
    1. You walk up to the desk and say you want to play 1-3 no-limit. If there is an empty seat they will send you to that seat. If the games are full you will put your name on the wait list.
    2. When a seat becomes available, they will call your name.
    3. Buy your chips at the poker room cage and then take your seat.
    4. Verify with the dealer that you are at the correct table.
    5. Take your chips out of the rack and stack them neatly (It is best if you make stacks of 20 chips so they are easy to count out).
    6. Play the game! I am assuming you know the basic mechanics of the game (know when it is your turn to act, post your blind, show your hand, etc.)

    Since this is your first time playing live, here are some tips to help you not make an ass of yourself/look like a total newb.
    -Pay attention to the game so you know when it's your turn, how much your opponent has bet, etc.
    -Don't take forever to make a decision unless it is a really big or difficult one. You are not on TV and nobody will be impressed by you pretending to think deeply about your hand. Instead you will be holding things up and making everyone else angry.
    -Keep your chips neatly stacked, as stated above.
    -Learn to count out chips quickly, like they do on TV. There is no bigger sign of a fish than when someone takes forever to count out a certain number of chips one at a time.
    -If you win a big pot DO NOT celebrate like you just hit a jackpot. Remember that in order for you to win, someone else had to lose. Just stack your chips and play the next hand. On the corollary, do not be a sour loser or berate a player for making a bad call and getting lucky. Just say, "good hand" and play the next hand.
    -It is customary to tip the dealer at least $1 for each pot you win that is over $10-12. You will look like a jerk if you are a stiff.
    -Protect your hand! Only peak at the corners of your cards and cover them with your hand when looking (like they do on TV). It is YOUR FAULT if the players next to you see your cards. Never lift your cards up off the table to look at them. If I was next to a person doing that I would look and take advantage of them all night.
    -THIS ONE IS VERY IMPORTANT- You've probably heard people in movies say something like, "I call your bet, and I raise you X." In the real world, your first declared action is your only action. If you say this, you have only called and your raise will not be valid. If you intend to raise, say "raise to $X," or just "raise" and place all your raising chips over the line in one motion. If you put chips over the line and then go back to your stack to get more chips, this is called a "string bet" and will not be allowed. All bets must be made in one motion unless you verbalize the amount of the bet/raise.
    -Never comment about a hand that you are not currently involved in. If you have folded, do not discuss the action with other players, including talking about what cards you had. You may be influencing the way the players that are still in will play their hand, which is very bad etiquette.
    -If you have a question for the dealer, ask between hands so you don't distract them and cause dealing mistakes to be made.
    -Unlike in casino table games, you cannot take any money off of the table unless you plan on leaving the game. All money on the table is considered part of the game and must be "available" to the other players until you choose to leave the game.

    This is already pretty long (as happens whenever I try to give poker playing advice) so I will end here. Let me know if you have any other questions.

    Good luck!
     
  4. elrohir44

    elrohir44 Low-Roller

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    While it's true that the other players will not like it, their opinion is worth squat in a real poker room. If he was playing a home game that he wanted to get invited back to I would totally agree, but in this case his money is his money and he shouldn't worry too much about it. He only plans on playing a short session anyway. He should not feel obligated to stay around if he doubles up.
     
  5. kiwigreg

    kiwigreg Tourist

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    Good advice,
     
  6. Gargamel

    Gargamel Low-Roller

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    I played at Wynn about a month ago when I passed through Vegas. My by-ins at 1/3 were only $300- I think the max is $500. Never saw anyone at a 1/3 table with $10k, maybe 3 or 4k at most. When seated the dealer would call over a chip runner who you gave your cash to and they went to get your chips. The first game I played was very soft and last game I played was full of experienced players - half of whom left the cash game when the tourney started:thumbsup:
    The rest of my games were a good mix of people. All the Wynn employees were nice and the drink service was fast. Don't assume everyone is a High Roller.

    Here is a link to the Trooper97- who Vlogs his life in Vegas playing poker - mostly at Planet Hollywood. (Maybe NSFW - lots of four letter words)
    https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTrooper97Vlog
     
  7. Bo333

    Bo333 VIP Whale

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    Very good etiquette summary.
     
  8. Nevyn

    Nevyn VIP Whale

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    Yeah, I would not worry about hitting and running in this context.

    Someone who does it regularly to take chips out of play is going to be seriously frowned on. A tourist walking in with $200? They won't be happy to see you go, but thats because they want your money. You don't owe them more chances.
     
  9. scc31

    scc31 Low-Roller

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    Thanks all!
    elrohir44, especially, for that great summary of pretty much live play.

    I play frequently online and in person with friends (those are only like $20-30 buy-in nights just for fun and hanging out so even if I go ujp to $150 or something, i tend to stay even if i risk losing it all by end of night). i know all the rules and such of pokers but my only concern was pretty much the etiquette i'm suppose to follow at a poker table. i can count chips relatively quickly and i hate taking my time to make a decision (unless it's an all in moment) so that shouldn't be an issue. I think from this post, everyone is on the same page that hittng and running as tourist shouldn't matter. LOL which is what i thought. it's my money and they can try to regain it from somebody else if they don't like it. it's not like i'm going to be trying to short change everyone and leave as soon as i win my first hand and then try to go back in minutes later.

    one more quick question. assuming I buy in at a 1/3 table for say $200-300. what are the chips given? are they the same as the ones on the floor? or do they have their own seperate chips that makes it easier for the big binds and stuff like a $3 chip.
     
  10. johnvic

    johnvic VIP Whale

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    Buying in for $200 at a 1-3 is not really playing with a short stack. But it's also not buying in for a standard amount. A standard buy in would be 100 BB, so $300. But buying in short would be closer to 25 BB, So $100 would be closer to that, 33 BB. I think you either buy in short and play a short stack strategy or buy in standard and play deeper.
     
    Super Bowl Weekend for a Bachelor Party!
  11. scc31

    scc31 Low-Roller

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    Is there a difference in strategy? What owuld you say 2hours of play should follow? short stack?
     
  12. johnvic

    johnvic VIP Whale

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    I'm just saying that if you buy in short then play a short stack strategy. But if you buy in for 100 BB then play a standard strategy. The amount of time you play makes no difference. Also, playing for 2 hours is fine, I would not consider that a hit and run.
     
    Super Bowl Weekend for a Bachelor Party!
  13. elrohir44

    elrohir44 Low-Roller

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    Most poker rooms use standard $5 chips in no-limit games. Some rooms that spread 1-3NL use $3 chips for some reason, and I have heard that Wynn does this (I have never played there, so don't quote me on this). Poker rooms typically use the same chips used in the rest of the casino, so you can technically cash them in at the main cage, but the poker dealers will not color you up. The employees at the main cage will probably look at you strange if you walk up with a few stacks of $5 or $3 chips. Just take your rack of chips to the chip runner in the room and cash out before you leave.

    As far as short-stack NL strategy, the farther below 100bb you are, the more you will be focusing on getting all in early in the hand with strong hands rather than chasing draws or making creative plays. This is because your pot-to-stack ratio will be much larger than if you made a larger buy-in. You will get pot-committed much more easily. Therefore you must play tighter pre-flop and push your strong hands hard. You may be better-off buying in for only $100 actually (if allowed), since it will make your post-flop decisions much easier. Having 50-75bb in your stack puts you in awkward mathematical territory, since you often have too much to value bet all-in but too little to call mid-sized bets post flop or have strong implied odds when drawing.

    I have a personal policy against teaching poker strategy to people I don't know so I think I've said too much already LOL. I hope this helps you a little bit.
     
  14. scc31

    scc31 Low-Roller

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    That is actually how I was thinking, thanks in advance~!
     
  15. johnvic

    johnvic VIP Whale

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    Actually one problem with playing a short stack strategy for a shorter time is that since you will be playing so many less hands you may feel like you get less out of your experience.
     
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  16. garry

    garry Tourist

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    When you get to the table. Sit facing the walk way to the Wynn pool, when your not in a hand great scenery to watch.
     
  17. scc31

    scc31 Low-Roller

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    I would like to also post this additional question. What would be the best time for a run at the table? As in the most action going on. Would you say in the early mornings or near the end of the day or in the middle? By most action I just mean that there will be high and low rollers there playing and having a good time.
     
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