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things I need to know or do prior to a european trip?

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by makikiboy, Feb 21, 2013.

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  1. makikiboy

    makikiboy VIP Whale

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    Looks like I will be booking a european trip next week. Have to book and pay by the end of feb to get discounts. But then I will be going at the end of April so not much time to plan, especially since I'm going to vegas in 2 weeks and still completing my plans on that trip (car rentals are high and hotels aren't much better).

    I was wondering, coming from the US, will I need any special shots or immunizations prior to travel?

    Any other things I need to do or have? I have my passport in hand but completely ignorant about all the things I need to do or get ready for my trip. This is my first trip outside of the US. I was trying to look for sites which will help me but most sites I found were hard to navigate to find the info I need.

    any special things about customs or special forms I need to have filled out prior to travel?

    :wave:
     
  2. Joe

    Joe VIP Whale

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    Can't help on advise, but I envy you. We each bought passports three years ago and haven't used them! I am so itching to go somewhere where a passport is required.
     
    Christmas
  3. mike_m235

    mike_m235 Tourist

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    I'm American but lived in Europe for 5 years at different points. I was also back there for 3 weeks in December.

    You don't need anything in the way of visas. Just your passport, if it's a US passport.

    As far as what else you need to do...it depends where you're going. If you're going to drive, I strongly recommend that you take a quick look online for traffic signs. It's not the same as the US. For example, there's no I95 north. There's just highway 6, with the name of the city in each direction. So to know which way you're going, you need to know which city you're heading toward. You'll pick it up quick, but the first time you get out on the road it's going to be intimidating, and you are going to see signs you've never seen before.

    Personally I'd try to work my trip by train and skip the car, which is easy to do in most of europe, and give up on the car. Especially if you're going to be in major cities. Passenger trains are much more convenient and common in europe than in the US.

    Hotels are expensive in Germany/France/England. Most european hotels are like US hotels now with bathrooms in the room, but not all, so make sure you check. And you need reservations...you're not going to just be able to pull off of an exit and see a motel on the side of the road. Although there are mom and pop joints in just about every small town...but not convenient to the highway like you'd find in the US.

    You're going to want a power adapter. Depending on the countries, you may need different types of plugs. You can buy a set, though. You need to be able to transform 220 into 110 to run anything you've got, except most new electronics (laptops, ipads) will take either. But you'll still need an adapter to plug those devices into the wall.

    Tell me where you're going and I'll give you more specific advice.
     
  4. bbbbcccc

    bbbbcccc Tourist

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    It would help if you said what country you are considering, but if you are talking about one of the major continental countries (Germany, France, Spain, etc.) There isn't much to it. I think England may force you to prove that you have finances to maintain your stay, and a ticket to leave, but that's second hand knowledge.

    As for the majority of Europe, there are no immunizations required. Customs is easier than in the US. You just walk up, hand them your passport, they spend 15 seconds talking amongst themselves in their native language, (presumably to give themselves a chance to see if you look nervous) stamp your passport, then you're done. It has never taken me more than 30 seconds. Also, once you are in, you can travel to any other country in the Schengen area, which is most of Europe, without customs. Though sometimes the Dutch customs officials will board the trains heading into or out of the Netherlands to check passports between stops.

    Other things to consider include travel insurance. While most European countries have some form of national health care, this will not apply to you, and costs can get expensive in a hurry. Travel insurance is cheap. Cost depends on length of stay, but a few hundred dollars should more than cover it. If you are planning something adventurous (skiing, mountain climbing, etc.) You may also want to make sure your travel insurance covers an airlift should it be needed.

    If you are on medication, I would recommend that you take copies of your prescriptions, and make sure to keep your medicine in properly labeled bottles. Also realize that in some countries, medications that are available over the counter in the US may require a prescription there.

    As for money, I would recommend just taking a credit card. The cash advance fee, foreign currency fee, and ATM fee will probably not be too much worse than changing currency with a money changer, and ATMs are everywhere, so it is easy and you don't risk losing cash. Another piece of advice there is to call your company and inform them of your travel plans ahead of time so that they can put a notation on your account so it isn't flagged as fraud, which will get your card denied.

    Outside of that, I would have to know more about your travel plans. What country are you going to, do you plan to travel around? (That is very easy by train or the cheapo airlines they have) What do you like to do? That type of thing.

    Wikitravel.org is a great website to look at for info on European travel.

    Also, don't stress yourself out. It will be a little strange for the first day or so. All the signs in a different language, people speaking different languages, and everything, but nearly everyone in Europe speaks at least a little English, and most are fluent. Everyone is willing to go out of their way to help you. Europe is a great place to travel, and I've enjoyed every trip I have made. You will enjoy it.
     
  5. Kiwicol

    Kiwicol Low-Roller

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    You will have a great time - very different from what you are used to - but that is why you are going right?

    The big thing is just to relax and enjoy it.

    For example I love being in America as lots of it is very different to what I am used to here or in England where I am from originally. Even little things like an "entree" being a starter for us, but the main meal for you, and the size of the portions - all quite unusual but part of the fun.

    You will find most border crossings much easier than getting in and out of the USA (or even travelling domestically in the US !). I would suggest taking photocopies of your key documents (passport, air tickets, itinerary, travel insurance etc) and having those in a separate bag to your actual passport, and leaving a copy with a relative at home. Getting a photo of them on your cellphone is a good idea as well.

    Having a cellphone with access to maps/GPS/internet is a real bonus. There are also apps which help with translation as well now which I understand work well. Obviously you want to make sure your phone plan doesnt make using the phone really expensive.

    have a great time.
     
  6. bbbbcccc

    bbbbcccc Tourist

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    If you have an American plan, using it in Europe will be quite expensive. If you are going to be over there a while, a good alternative is to go to a store on the first day there and buy a European SIM card. Then you just switch out cards in your phone, and can talk/look at data for much, much cheaper. You should be able to do that for $20-25, then minimal fees for actual usage. If you are just going for a week or so, I wouldn't bother. You may even enjoy not having to deal with a phone.
     
  7. zamboni

    zamboni VIP Whale

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    Might be mistaken, but you also need an international drivers license.
     
  8. bbbbcccc

    bbbbcccc Tourist

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    Licensure is country specific, but it is not the general rule. Some countries (Austria, maybe others) require it, but most do not. I rented a car to test out the Autobahn from Frankfurt to Munich and back two years ago, and my US drivers license was sufficient.
     
  9. BlueSkadoo

    BlueSkadoo VMB Sweetheart

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    Are you trying to do it on the cheap or live it up? This too will help us give you some good advice. I've done the backpacking across Europe thing (never again!) and I can tell you about hostels if you're interested in that part.

    Also, make a copy of your passport and leave it at home with someone who has the ability to fax/scan that to the US embassy of the country you're in should you happen to "misplace" your American passport so you can get the information you need.

    My first trip to Europe I wore one of those neck wallet things that goes under your clothes and never took it off except to shower, and on my second, I just kept it stashed in my pack the whole time. I felt better not having it around my neck, but I've seen they also make waist ones as well so you can have your passport and some money "hidden". Its all about what puts you at ease.

    I also got sick with tonsillitis in Europe (in Prague of all places) and I was lucky my doctor had given me an extra 10-day supply of antibiotics for "just in case" so I didn't have to try to find a doctor while I was there. This might be something you choose to do, as long as your doctor will go along with it.
     
  10. BreakEven

    BreakEven Low-Roller

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    Lots of fantastic advice already in this thread. My post will be long, but hopefully worth it.

    http://travelstore.ricksteves.com/catalog/index.cfm?fuseaction=product&theParentId=163&id=20 Get that from the library, or better yet just buy it. $14 for paperback @ Amazon. I'm not suggesting that you need to read it cover to cover (though I found it interesting), but it'll have simple answers for pretty much all of your basic questions. I was glad that I'd read it before heading to Europe.

    One important piece of info - you need to pay to use the toilet in many areas. Always have change.

    I'd suggest reading at least some of the info here, if you plan on bringing things back: http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/vacation/kbyg/ Read the rules on prohibited items & what food can/can't be brought back with you. Save the receipts for everything you're bringing back. Put them in an envelope that you take in your carry-on.

    On the flight back, they'll hand out this form. In my limited experience, they hand this out very late in the flight. Ask if you can get it earlier, so you'll have plenty of time to fill it out. Be specific on the form, especially when it comes to food. Don't just say "Food - $200". Say "Chocolate - $150" or "Pastries - $50".

    Keep in mind that when getting off the plane, everyone on that flight and probably a number of other flights will all have to get through the same checkpoint. I'm not suggesting that you run, but you definitely don't want to be the last person off :)

    I've never driven in Europe, but it's also my understanding that automatic transmissions are VERY rare. Near impossible to find at a "neighborhood" location, so requires an advance reservation @ an airport location.

    I agree completely. Unfortunately he can't buy tickets far in advance, but he might still be able to get a decent deal on high speed rail. Even within the cities, the transit systems in most areas are amazing. Worth looking into the cost of a multi-day pass (which may or may not be good from the airport).

    They are also very small.

    Probably easier to just get a universal adapter.

    Something like this - http://www.amazon.com/Pack-Universal-Travel-Power-Adapter/dp/B002CICVR8/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1361506860&sr=8-15&keywords=travel+power+adapter

    Note: It's $2.50. You definitely get what you pay for here. Bring a few, just in case one of them breaks. If you have a lot of electronics, bring a power strip and plug that into this thing instead. This is a fairly portable one - http://www.amazon.com/Monster-MP-OTG400-BK-Outlets/dp/B000F9YN2M/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1361506916&sr=8-4&keywords=travel+power+adapter

    insuremytrip.com is a great site to use to compare plans. For the last point, that's medical evacuation insurance. You can get that as a part of a per-trip plan, or you can also purchase annual coverage.

    I'd disagree with this one. The cash advance fees for some cards can be pretty brutal. Many US banks have global alliances with other banks, so you don't pay any access fees when using their ATM machines. There will still be a foreign transaction fee, but you'll get a decent exchange rate.

    Also, you may find that many places will not accept your credit card. Long story short, the US is behind the times. Most major sites won't have an issue with it, but automated kiosks @ train or gas stations may not work.

    Best advice in this thread! :thumbsup:

    I totally agree on the last part. But the phone is so handy if that's the only mechanism you have to connect to the net.

    To use a local SIM, you'd need to have an unlocked phone. OP - If you're not sure, let us know what you have and someone can point you in the right direction. But yes, the normal US roaming rates are absolutely ridiculous. If you decide you aren't using the phone, make SURE that you know how to turn off all of the data features on the phone. Otherwise you might be in for a nasty surprise when you return.

    prepaidgsm.net is a great resource for prepaid plans in various countries. If you are going to hit multiple countries in your trip, you may be able to find a SIM that lets you roam at a reasonable rate across all of them.

    http://www.amazon.com/Eagle-Creek-Travel-Undercover-Hidden/dp/B0054IH9UC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1361507454&sr=8-1&keywords=travel+wallet
    http://www.amazon.com/Rick-Steves-Silk-Money-Natural/dp/B000PWLROQ/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1361507466&sr=8-7&keywords=travel+wallet
    http://pacsafe.com/
     
    Only 2nd trip for year :(
  11. Judge Smails

    Judge Smails Tourist

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    I currently have been living in Germany the past 18 months and lots of good advice so far. I will add my thoughts on a couple of things.

    Driving: Unless you want to rent a car for a day in Germany to go out on the Autobahn in a no speed zone to have some fun it isn't worth it. You will be paying for gas in euros, pounds etc per liter. Right now in Germany gas is going around $9.00 a gallon when you convert euros to dollars and liters to gallons. To fill my 335I sedan up on the economy it would cost around $125. Also driving in some of the major cities can be a nightmare. If you go to Paris, Rome, Amsterdam or other major cities you will understand. Just go with a train or a cheap airline like Ryan Air.

    Phone: Some countries want you to have a local bank account just to get a sim card or a burner phone. Also consider if you get your sim card in Germany with T-Mobile and cross the border into Austria you are roaming. It isn't like the states with Verizon where you can use it from Maine to Hawaii. If you have a smartphone most hotels and cafes offer free wifi for skype or facetime.

    Money: Check with your credit card issuers to see if they have a foreign transaction fee. I have the Chase Sapphire Preferred and no fee. Cap One doesn't charge one either. Citi charges around 3% and Amex is close to the same. If you have Discover don't bother to bring it. The only country I have seen here that takes it is Portugal. As somebody else brought up US cards may not work at kiosks at train stations. Most euro credit/debit cards have a chip in them for security. Make sure you call the banks and let them know where you will be. If not your card may get shut down.

    As for cash you will need it. Some places don't take cards at all and offer discounts with cash. In the states I maybe carried $30 but now I take many euros on trips. You can either hit atm's here, see if your bank will sell them or convert dollars. Just don't convert at the airport.

    Travel Guides: Rick Steeve is your friend. By some of his books and if you have an Ipad/touch/phone he has free audio guides in itunes you can download for major sites. Also in the books he gives good ideas for hotels, food, sites and ways to save money. Well worth it and it saves using many of the big tour groups.

    Language: Besides the UK and Ireland people will be speaking a different language. However the second language taught in Europe is english. In major tourist areas I have never had a problem at all. The only area where people can be rude is Paris. Some of the sterotypes you have heard are true. If you visit Germany they are very direct people. It can come off as rude but that is the way they are.

    Safety: Just like places in the US there are places to avoid. Be carful on trams, buses and city trains around tourist areas. Pickpocket heaven. If somebody comes up and asks you to sign something it may be a scam. I use a money belt. I keep cash for the day, one cc and one ID. Leave the passport and excess cash and cards in the safe in the room. The money belt is a good buy.

    110-220: As others have said get the adapters. Your phone, tablet and laptop will be dual voltage. If it says 100-240v, 50-60hz you are set. If it doesn't than leave it at home.

    If you have any questions on certain cites or places to go post them.
     
  12. mike_m235

    mike_m235 Tourist

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    You used to have to have an international drivers license, now you don't most places.

    Most cars used to be standard, and most Germans still drive standards. But if you rent from the airport it's going to be automatic for the most part. We rented six cars in our group when we were there in December, and all were automatic. Even my Audi A6.
     
  13. mikenhe

    mikenhe VIP Whale

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    Thats a bit harsh on Paris. I came across some very nice people there.
    I have also come across some very rude people in other places.

    What I found was that if you tried to speak in their language then people were normally very helpful even if you have to revert back to English.

    Its just in Paris there seems to be a higher proportion of people who didn't care if you were making an effort :D

    and yes the germans can be very direct - but thats just a cultural thing.

    More info about where you are visiting will help you get better answers....
     
  14. makikiboy

    makikiboy VIP Whale

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    Thanks guys! Lots of good info.

    Sorry, was busy this morning, united opened up some mileage seats and just when I was deciding I had to go to an emergency staff meeting with the boss. when I came back all those mileage seats were gone! Rats, guess I have to book quickly when I see them next time.

    Initially I was going to do europe on the very cheap and backpack and hostel everything but it got to be too difficult trying to set everything up (hotel, transportation, how to get around, etc.) so I decided to do a tour instead.

    http://www.trafalgar.com/usa/european-accent-2013

    For a first timer a tour might be best. The tour will start in London, then go to amsterdam (need to stay away from the red light district, lol), germany, switzerland, then italy and end up in paris. Most of the tour will be set up so I won't have to worry much about what to do. I probably won't be driving a car either.

    I am thinking of staying in london an extra day before and paris maybe an extra day or two after the tour. On those days I will probably hostel it.

    The good thing about the tour is that everything is taken care of for me, I can take along a full sized suitcase (was only going to take a backpack if hostelling it), transportation and hotel taken care of, many meals too. The bad part of tours is the fast pace (have to get up early to be ready to leave for the day), inability to freelance as most hotels are on the outside of town, no time to rest (especially if you get sick or need a day off), funnelling you into their specific stores and activities and the tour pushing you to buy their activities.

    But then I can always go back again if I wanted to.

    Some questions, how easy is it to get into London from Heathrow? I did google searches and found the buses to be the cheapest form of transportation into London. Can I take along my suitcase and handcarry on the buses? It seems cheaper to do buses than the underground or take the shuttles. How about in Paris, how easy is it to get to CDG from central Paris?

    Money will be a slight problem as they use the pound in London but can use the euro in most of the other countries I am visiting. I am also afraid of using my regular credit card, heard many horror stories of cc number being stolen and used to rack up charges while on vacation. I plan to use my cc only on the big ticket items (added tours and maybe big ticket charges if I buy something) but use cash for the rest. I know in the US there are some cc's or debit cards that can be purchased that contain a specific dollar amount, are those safer than using my own cc or bringing cash? I think there are some places in hawaii where I can change currency, I heard that it might be more expensive if I try to change them when I get there. What type of loose change will I need in London to get around? What about laundromats? I plan to visit DC on the way to europe (split up my flight to try to avoid jet lag) so want to do laundry prior to starting the tour.

    I am going to be in vegas in 2 weeks so I will probably pick up the power adapter from Fry's or someplace. Picked up some clothes for the colder weather already, say, should I buy my clothes up there so I don't look as much as a foreigner up there (I'm asian so will probably stick out anyway, lol).

    So many questions, so little time, lol. Very interesting trying to plan out the trip. I might be leaving at the end of april so I only have a couple of months to plan and get all my info.

    I will probably bring along my notebook computer so probably won't need a phone, as long as I can find a wifi signal will probably email it to avoid phone charges.

    Too bad, I wouldn't have minded driving the autoban but won't have the time. I've been driving standard transmission cars most of the life, only in the last 10 years have I driven automatics so that wouldn't be a problem (unless the clutch is sticky or hard lol).

    thanks for all the info guys, keep them coming! Any tidbit is appreciated to make this trip a good one! :wave:
     
  15. mike_m235

    mike_m235 Tourist

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    Heathrow to London is an hour by car with traffic. Maybe more. Cost me 70 pounds for a cab. Train is easier if you can manage it, and the train system in the UK is super easy to figure out. Everyone takes bags on public transportation from there, so it's no problem.

    You'll have very little trouble doing a tour. My parents did it, and they're about as un-travel-savvy as it gets.

    For London, just watch where you are. Crime isn't as bad as the US, but it's a huge city, so it's got good spots and bad spots just like any city.
     
  16. HoyaHeel

    HoyaHeel Grammar Police & Admin

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    RER (train) Paris to CDG can be crowded and might be a little difficult with luggage - it's a commuter route, so it really depends on the time of day you'd be using it. Taxis can be expensive, shuttles are notably unreliable (based on TA & flytertalk reviews) Roissy bus highly recommended if it's easy for you to get to the Opera to pick it up (take a taxi or metro)

    For an overview trip, sounds like you've made a good decision for you - sample a little bit of everything, see what you like.

    Now - go rent If It's Tuesday, it Must be Belgium :peace:

    Oh - money - I never exchange before I travel because it would cost me too much to order euros. I have a Capital One money market account and I use ATMs to access that money when I travel (it's our vacation savings account, so....) I also take my personal bank ATM card as a backup, and we use credit cards for hotel or transportation but that's about it.
     
  17. dooner

    dooner High-Roller

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    makikiboy - that is the same trip I booked about 7 years ago with Trafalgar (except I didn't use the Costsaver) - it was also my first time to Europe and felt totally at ease with the tour.

    The tour director will be available for any questions. The itinerary is also very rigidly set out for you - basically luggage in the hallway at about 6:00 a.m.. Then on the bus, stop for coffee after a few hours. Then arrive at destination and tour sites (rinse and repeat). They also offer some optional sites to see for payment (if you choose all - about $600 euro for all). The Trafalgar website gives you a good idea of some that are available. These are generally paid for by credit card to the director (they get commission for options booked).

    There is a lot of good stuff to look for - I like some of the information offered already - in fact, I've just booked another Trafalgar tour to Russia this summer.

    P.S. It was a good mix of age/demographics on the trip - lots of Americans and Canadians - from young couples, to families, to a few older couples. (Not the stereotypical old timers tour)
     
  18. GreatGamblino

    GreatGamblino Low-Roller

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    This is all excellent advice. Can we look forward to a trip report?? :)

    If you don't necessarily need to make calls while you're abroad but still want to be able to reach family/friends in the US, you may check with your cell carrier to see if they offer a temporary international text plan. On my last two trips to Europe & South America, I added a $10 charge to my plan that allowed for a set number of international texts during the month of my travel. It was a convenient way to keep in touch with folks back home.

    Also, as Judge Smails suggested, be sure to notify your banks/credit card companies of your travel dates and destinations. AND be sure to sign the backs of your cards! I didn't and it was a problem.
     
  19. BreakEven

    BreakEven Low-Roller

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    Again, I am sorry for the long post. I spent sooo long researching a similar trip within the past year that I'm trying to share some of the lessons learned either from that research, or from painful personal experience.

    A few helpful sites:
    http://www.expertflyer.com/ (how it works http://thepointsguy.com/2011/10/using-expertflyer-com-for-award-availability/)
    https://awardnexus.com/user/login?url=%2F

    I know for expertflyer that you can set up an alert if there's availability on the flight that you want. If you're going to rely on miles, and you've already booked a tour, you can't be too picky here. You'll have to take what you can get. Don't want to wait too long for the perfect set of flights. And you can always make changes to this later (for a fee, I'm sure).

    Another thing to consider is how many transfers you'd need to do, and whether or not you'll want to do that after you arrive from a long flight. I didn't look too much into the bus and just went for the train. There's Heathrow Express and Heathrow Connect...forget which one is cheaper.

    I've used this bus both times I've been to Paris:
    http://www.lescarsairfrance.com/en.html

    I've only used them for travel to the airport, so I don't know how easy they are to find @ CDG.

    That can happen anywhere. I wouldn't worry about this at all. Your credit card company may have the ability to alert you to transactions above a particular amount, or to all foreign transactions. If you're really concerned, sign up for this.

    No. They have their own fees and their own hassles.

    The guidance I got on a travel forum was that the best rates are typically at the ATM. These are people who argue over 1-2% of fees, so I felt that it was good advice. I didn't want to waste my time looking for the absolute best exchange rate, because it's really not going to be a lot of money unless you're taking out a substantial amount of cash. The phrase "penny wise and pound foolish" comes to mind.

    If you plan on buying a lot, keep in mind that you will have to lug all of that stuff with you through multiple countries. You should also look into the VAT (tax) refund options available.
    http://www.ricksteves.com/plan/tips/vat.htm

    On the topic of shopping, make sure you are always conscious of the fact that you're paying in Euros or Pounds and NOT dollars. That 40GBP sweater that I bought in London wasn't such a great bargain when I did the math. (It was made even worse when I found a gigantic hole in it AFTER I returned to the US :grrr:)

    I'd look for services that will do it for you.

    http://www.allinlondon.co.uk/directory/1261/4921.php

    IMO, something like this is well worth it (I'm 99% sure I used the exact same service when I was there, but I think the sign changed). When you think about how much it's costing you for other parts of the trip, and that this will save you roughly 1hr of vacation time, it's not really much of a splurge. You may want to look into the hotels you'll be staying at on your tour to see which ones have a laundry available for guests or have one nearby.

    Good idea to do the laundry before the tour, but you'll probably still get a chance to try doing it yourself in another country. When I was in France, I found that it was pretty interesting :) I never would've figured it out in a million years if I didn't have a smartphone with me that helped translate the text on the sign.

    http://www.francetravelplanner.com/go/paris/shop/laundromat_use.html
    Good plan, but I think they are closer to $10 there (still way better than what you'd pay at best buy or Staples). They'll also have a bunch of individual adapters.

    I've also heard good things about this bus service. Only reason I picked the one above is that it happened to drop off close to my hotel. Many Paris Metro stops will have steep staircases and possibly no elevator access. Another thing to keep in mind when you have luggage. Or picture yourself dragging luggage with little tiny wheels up and down hills on cobblestone streets at 5am. When I was doing that, I regretted every single extra ounce of weight in my bag (esp. the giant duffle bag full of souvenirs). The ONLY upside was that this extra workout helped me burn some of the calories from all of the delicious things I stuffed in my face.

    As far as language, you should probably understand some basic terms for all of the areas you'll be travelling through. Hello, goodbye, thank you and then some of the food basics (beef/chicken/pork/etc.), especially if you have food allergies. I know the Rick Steves guides list some of these basics in the city-specific guides.

    For your time before and after the tour, I would suggest that you don't overbook yourself. Think about the things that are most critical for you to do/see while you are there. You may have to skip some stuff this time if it's really out of the way. For example, touring the Normandy beaches is not really a simple day trip from Paris. You'd burn a lot of hours on trains, and you'd still be disappointed with what you didn't get to see.
     
    Only 2nd trip for year :(
  20. Dpin300

    Dpin300 Low-Roller

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    Doesn't look like you'll be staying that long in amsterdam :(

    The 30th of april is called queensday here. Big national party. It'll even be bigger this year as the queen's stepping down and our prince will be crowned king. Which is al nice and everything but it's all about the party of course.

    Some pictures for an idea: click here

    If I were you I'd definitely try to be in Amsterdam then!
     
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