1. Welcome to VegasMessageBoard
    It appears you are visiting our community as a guest.
    In order to view full-size images, participate in discussions, vote in polls, etc, you will need to Log in or Register.

The Demise Of The Yellow Jacket

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by Breeze147, Jun 27, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    What the hell happened to the bees? It has been several years now. I see the odd drone now and then, but no bees. They are a crucial element in vegetable growing with their ability to pollinate.

    Which leads to another question: How the hell do the farmers do it? I'm growing these bizarre, egg-shaped cucumbers. They start out great and then suddenly stop and end up with a "lumpy" part at the stem, sort of ending up having the shape of a fat summer squash. Online research showed that this is caused by a lack of proper pollination. I also had many female buds, like hundreds, that grew about an inch and then died, also due to lack of pollination.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2014
  2. zamboni

    zamboni VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Messages:
    2,004
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    8
    We have a ton of wasps and hornets still here, but when I was a little kid, there were bumblebees everywhere. I haven't seen one of those in years. Monarchs are another thing that used to be plentiful and have all but disappeared here
     
    Super Bowl 2017!!!!
    Super Bowl 2017!!!
  3. Joe

    Joe VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    Messages:
    11,333
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    175
    Christmas
    My wife's birthday
  4. jpw711

    jpw711 VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,551
    Location:
    Southwest Missouri
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    50
    As far as where did the bees go, you got me.

    As far as the demise of the yellow jacket, there's no such thing. Those bastards are all over the place here in Missouri. Especially behind/between the brick mold and siding around my garage door right at the keyless entry. Those suckers can hit you multiple times in a second while calling all their friends to join the party. Bee's don't bother me, at least they die when they sting, the hornet on the other hand, they are just mean nasty creatures.
     
  5. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Well, I guess whichever bee pollinates, they ain't here no more. Neither are yellow jackets. Gone. Hornets, another pollinator are disappearing, too.

    So how do the farmers pollinate?

    Once, when I was about 12, I sat down on log, which turned out to be a yellow jacket nest. They counted over a hundred stings. I was stung many times by hornets and bees. But not in at last 10 years or so.

    I'll read that article, Joe, thanks.
     
  6. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Just read it, Joe. How fricking sad. Modern science killed them.
     
  7. Sonya

    Sonya Queen of VMB

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 1999
    Messages:
    21,852
    Location:
    Western Washington
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    18
    We have a couple fruit trees and a few years ago, none of them pollinated. I noticed a drop in our bee population that year. Next spring I put a small box of mason bees in the yard and we had fruit again.

    We have a lot of mason bees (small, dark bees) and the big, fat bumble bees that sound like they have an outboard motor attached. We also have plenty of wasps around, unfortunately. (including that one that likes to make a nest right above my kitchen sliding door. Bastard!) What we don't seem to have a lot of is the standard yellow/black honey bees.

    After our beeless summer, we went pesticide and herbicide free in the yard. I also went to organic fertilizers, vs the Miracle Grow kind. I even stopped putting neem oil on the fruit trees to combat the tent caterpillars and try to pick them off instead. It's a lot more work for me, but the critters seem happier in the yard.
     
  8. Snidely

    Snidely VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Messages:
    1,977
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    20
    I felt but I had to take out a mason bee nest that was in the bed right next to my garage. Wasps love my house. There are usually at least two types making their nests. They've gotten smarter and build their nests where I can't reach them. I've had to reach out second story windows with a 10 foot pole to knock their nests down.
     
  9. Bubbavegas

    Bubbavegas VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,446
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    21
    Sadly this is the tip of the iceberg I fear and things are not looking to get any better, there is a reason that so many nations are banning GMOs and a connection to the reduction of honey bees is a big part of it, without the pollinators the Earth is screwed. With a small garden you can hand pollinate which is what I do sometimes when I have two really great plants so I can store more seeds from them for the future but with large scale they do not have to worry about it since they are using the GMO crops or possibly other methods. I am allergic to honey bees so I bought butterflys at a local organic gardening supply for my garden as I have not seen a honeybee in my area since a huge wheat operation started up 5 years ago using the roundup ready crap, the butterflys did a good job and a few hung around afterward but I will have to restock for sure eventually to keep my plants producing. Good luck is all I can say.
    This BTW is my tomato patch, my heirlooms are killing it this season :)
    [​IMG]
     
    Cosmo Christmas
  10. maxnew40

    maxnew40 Low-Roller

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    203
    Location:
    Everett, WA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    11
    Yellow Jackets are wasps and do not pollinate they even eat meat.

    I thought I had read that it was pesticides that have identified as the issue and not any GMO crops (cross breeding plants to produce hybrids or to reinforce traits has been done for thousands of years and is genetically modifying those plants, sorry).

    I live north of Seattle and have not any issues with my thorn less black berries getting lots of visits from bees. I have noticed less bees when my rhodies bloom though.

    -Max
     
  11. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Wow, Bubba, those are some dynamite 'maters! Yeah, I'm going to hand pollinate my cucumbers. I had this big pipe dream of putting up several quarts of pickles, but I guess that won't happen, not this year anyway.

    That's what makes gardening such an interesting hobby. Always something new to learn, constant evolution.
     
  12. jerseyguy

    jerseyguy VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    2,294
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    I see bumble bees every day buzzing around my patio,but havent heard too much about yellowjackets. Not that I miss them. I live within about 60 ft. of the woods so a company comes every so often and sprays for mosquitos and ticks at the woods edge. Maybe thats killing some of the stinging insects also?
     
  13. USCHawks

    USCHawks High-Roller

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    896
    Location:
    Kennewick, WA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    9
    This pretty much sums it up my feelings...

    bee_or_wasp_helpful_identification_graphic-373212.jpg
     
  14. KellyLovesVegas

    KellyLovesVegas certified personal trainer/retired space nerd

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Messages:
    1,506
    Location:
    Houston
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    59
    Those are awesome tomato plants, Bubba!

    We still have plenty of wasps (black ones and red ones, which are especially nasty to me), bumblebees (which to me look like mini 737s) and the smaller black bees. We have a lot of flowering plants which the bees and hummingbirds enjoy. The wasps hide out in the shrubs near the pool and attack me while I'm swimming. Thank goodness for Benadryl.
     
  15. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Just sitting on my patio slurping down a Fat Tire last evening. No bees of any kind. Hardly any insects at all. Some dragonflys. Green flys, of course. Other years, I would have seen 10 or more bumble bees trolling through the clover.

    This year, zero.
     
  16. queuetee

    queuetee High-Roller

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2008
    Messages:
    640
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    25
    Our blossoms have become squash and tomatoes and cukes so we have some kind of polllination going on. Glad somebody mentioned butterflies. I didn't know that they could help and we have seen a large upturn in the butterfly population after years of having lost them.....glad they recovered.

    Speaking of wasps, we had a family take over one of our birdhouses. Dh noticed it when they began to stream out of the hole and chase him into the house. One evening, he tiptoed over to the birdhouse with a can of Raid and a strip of duct tape. He taped most of the hole and let it rip with the Raid into the birdhouse and then finished sealing up the hole.

    After a couple of days, we checked and pulled out the contents......yukky yellow everywhere. Dead wasps and a pile of what must have been wasp eggs.
     
  17. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Wow, yeah descriptive talent. I can almost smell the chicken in the bird puke! :beer:
     
  18. bardolator

    bardolator Lifelong Low Roller

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,434
    Location:
    Green, Ohio
    People around here have started keeping bees, so we have plenty locally. The bee problem has been an issue for quite a while, but typically, we don't hear much about it. If the government tries to do something about it, then you'll hear every day that it isn't a problem.

    Relax, everybody. Soylent green is coming.
     
  19. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    2,916
    Location:
    Southern Maryland by way of Philadelphia
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    15
    Well, you get to trip on cool drugs and watch Animal Planet at the end!:beer:
     
  20. Bubbavegas

    Bubbavegas VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,446
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    21
    Huge difference in GMO and crossbreeding. You don't create RoundUp ready through crossbreeding and yes GMOs have been associated wih the reduction in bees through sterility of the pollen and lack of nutrition gained by bees feeding on that pollen along with the use of neonicotinoid pesticides which were recently banned by the EC.
     
    Cosmo Christmas
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.