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[Split From Another Thread] This one time at an ATM

Discussion in 'Misc. Vegas Chat' started by jpete1966, May 22, 2012.

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  1. jpete1966

    jpete1966 Tourist

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    MODERATOR NOTE: SPLIT POST

    I was going to cash out a ticket which the ATM is right next to. This young girl is making a withdrawl and her pin doesn't work. Goes to her phone and scrolls thru about 100 numbers on her phone. 4 digits with a space and 4 more digits so your last 4 of cc and pin. Within a few seconds instant cash! It was quite an eyeopener knowing my personal info could be sitting on someones phone right now.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 23, 2012
  2. MangoPort

    MangoPort Low-Roller

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    Sorry, can you walk me through exactly what's happening. You're saying it was a stolen credit card and she was looking up her list of stolen credit cards with matching pins from her list of like 100 cards?
     
  3. Polemarch28

    Polemarch28 Tourist

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    No, he's talking about two different things I think. The first situation was a one where the thief (of the hotel furniture/items) probably used a phony credit card to give the front desk, since no one is stupid enough to give the hotel their true information and rob the room (hopefully). The second situation is one where some girl at an ATM was scrolling through her phone to find the correct pin number to go with a credit card number. The thought being - if she has that many credit card numbers and pins in her phone, they are probably all stolen.

    Just two situations in which people have phony credit card information.
     
  4. jpete1966

    jpete1966 Tourist

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    Yes, this was a separate incident. She couldn't get the pin to work at an ATM to make a withdrawl. I just happened to be to the left of her waiting to use the ticket machine next to the ATM she was using. She does the discrete look to the left and right and starts scrolling thru numbers on her phone. She scrolls and scrolls and stops, looks at the card she is using, looks at the phone, types in the pin and walks away. It seemed pretty obvious they were pin numbers.
     
  5. engicedave

    engicedave VIP Whale

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    He's pointing out she couldn't remember her pin, so she "hid" her pin# in her contacts phone numbers, last four #'s of the cc a dash and then the four digit pin.

    Not too well hidden is his point, if someone stole her purse, and got BOTH her card and cell phone
     
  6. jpete1966

    jpete1966 Tourist

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    No, I was pointing out that she scrolled thru at least 100 numbers with the last 4 of cc + the associated pin. She was clearly using a fake cc/debit card with someone else's info on it.

    You always hear about cc fraud and theft. I never thought it was that big of a deal until it happened to my parents. They got gas and the card reader was "out of order" so they had to go in to have the cashier swipe their card. On the next bill there were charges for various things about 600 miles south of where they live. It just so happens that it wasn't a card that they normally use so they could pinpoint where it was used last. Turns out that the cashier had a little card reader below the counter. One swipe and all the card info could be stored and transfered to another card. I guess it's common with waiters as well. They have direct access to your card when they go to ring you up and some will swipe card after card and sell the information.

    There was a pretty interesting show on cable (TLC, Discovery?) that I saw a few moths ago. This guy would actually go around and film black market activities such as car theft, cc theft etc...) On one show he met up with someone willing to show him how easy it was to steal someone's cc info. He took the host's cc, swiped it thru, embossed the digits on a Visa gift card and took the host into Best Buy to purchase an Ipad. 10 minutes later the Ipad was listed on Craigslist and less than an hour after that it was sold. I can't believe the guy let him film it but it was definitely an eyeopener.
     
  7. engicedave

    engicedave VIP Whale

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    Oh, guess I was confused by your initial response as well
     
  8. technolight

    technolight Low-Roller

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    Sorry I am a bit confused about this " CC scam " how do you know that the numbers she was looking up on her phone were not all legit , or that it was just her way of hiding / remembering her pin number . And of course you look around while finding your pin in case someone is looking over your shoulder.
    Also so if I see someone typing in or looking for their pin number I find it common decency to look the other way.

    You cannot call someome out for looking up a number without knowing all the facts.
     
  9. jpete1966

    jpete1966 Tourist

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    Relax guy, it was just an observation. Nobody was looking over her shoulder. I just happened to be in the line next to her when she was scrolling thru the files. I'm not calling anyone out as this was a random person in a random place. I doubt anyone has 100+ credit cards and keeps all the pins for them. Even if someone would keep hundreds of fakes the last 4 of the cc would match up with the pin anyway. I don't really care one way or the other. As far as not being legit I would say that 100's of cc #'s + pins + the fact she walked out the exit next to the ATM right away was a good start. I could be wrong. Maybe she came to the casino just to take advantage of their low ATM fees and not gamble. The bottom line is cc theft happens WAY more than people think and a casino ATM sure seems like a good target with all the transactions and people floating around. Pretty evident it was a scam to me.
     
  10. technolight

    technolight Low-Roller

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    Obviously you were looking over her shoulder , hundreds of numbers , 4 digits , etc I would have reported you to security for trying to see my pin number

    Pretty evident it was a scam, yeah right, prejudging people is not a very nice thing to do.
     
  11. Polemarch28

    Polemarch28 Tourist

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    Ehh. If you're standing in line for something, it's sometimes difficult NOT to notice what's happening in front of you. Can't really blame someone for catching something in a glance - especially if they are standing right next to you. I notice things like this all the time, and I'm not trying to be nosy. I am just observant, as was the poster here I think.

    Also, this isn't really prejudging someone. It's observing a fact, and drawing a conclusion from that fact. Is the conclusion accurate? Who knows. Did the poster publically accuse this person of fraud? No - no personal details were provided.

    It's just intuition. My intuition is usually right - but I don't make accusations based on it, without evidence to back it up. Neither did the poster - he just made an observation and shared it with the group. Thieves of this sort do exist, and it's in everyone interest to carefully safeguard their personal information.
     
  12. Tree DA

    Tree DA High-Roller

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    He wasn't pre-jugding, he was judging after observing what he observed. Sounds like he's spot in, imo.
     
  13. MangoPort

    MangoPort Low-Roller

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    As an aside, I recently saw a charge for about $1k on my credit card on a card I virtually NEVER use and it happened in Toronto, even though I've been living in Australia for more than a year.

    I had them cancel my card and obviously protested the charge in writing and I've been told it will be about 90 days + 45 days to find out if I'm going to "win" this case. In the meantime they have taken off the charge so I suppose that's a good sign.

    Anyone know the chances of me having to actually pay it? I obviously have proof I was in Australia at the time of the charge and I have the card in my possession.
     
  14. Terry Benedict

    Terry Benedict VIP Whale

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    I was using an atm in (the real) St. Mark's Square when the bank alarm went off. (Why do we say off? It went on -- really loud.) I quickly got my card back and left because the alarm hurt my ears. I went back ten minutes later and got some cash.

    When I got home, there seemed to be duplicate atm withdrawls from SMS. But in a pile of receipts from ten days in Italy, I couldn't be sure. I emailed my bank but they said they couldn't check the times on the withdrawls because they don't have access to Banco di Roma's records.

    Fast forward six months, there was a credit to my account for the duplicated amount. I hear complaints all the time about banks, but mine has been absolutely solid for me. I'm not nearly as concerned about credit card theft as I am identity theft.
     
  15. theotherone

    theotherone Low-Roller

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    Something similar happened to me years ago, on a card I never used and hadnt in over 5 years. I happen to notice an $80 charge from some place in Maryland or other state I never go to. Turns out it was a florist, and they had typed the number in wrong when someone ordered for a funeral. It was fixed quickly though -- I cant believe you have to submit in writing and all that, for something that *might* get corrected. I hope you win!

    And I fully agree with you Terry Benedict -- ID theft is much more scary, mostly because of the nightmare of fixing it if it happens.

    As for the OP, I'm thinking this was a theif but cannot say for sure. Maybe she is a chronic gambler/shopaholic and has tons of Daddy's credit cards on hand. I notice stuff like this too and am quick to look away out of courtesy.
     
  16. jack1057

    jack1057 Low-Roller

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    I got my card number stolen at one of the retail establishments on the strip about 3 years ago. The machine "wasn't working" so I foolishly handed my card to the clerk. Three months later, they took 1600.00 out of my account in one weekend. All at ATM's and they had the pin number. Cops could care less and bank ate the cost so nothing came of it. I was told that LV and Honolulu are the two worst places in the US to get a card stolen.
     
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