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Slots Question about slot payouts

Discussion in 'Slots' started by face12313, Aug 10, 2013.

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  1. face12313

    face12313 Tourist

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    hi,dears.
    The avg. payouts of vegas's slot is about 90%.What is it means?
    I search the google,some one said it is in a long run for example 1 week.some one said the "long run" is one year.

    And the most important is about 90%'s calculate method.
    if a long run means 1 week.
    a.100 customers put 100,000 cash in the slot to play.Whatever they paly,and casino get the 10,000 in a week.

    b.100 customers put 100,000 cash in the slot.Spin and Spin,in the end, casino get almost all the 100,000 cash.Because the reward(win back) is plus to the basic calculate.(100,000 cash+9,900,000 reward)*10%=100,000

    Do you think which is right? and how long is the "long run".
     
  2. Auggie

    Auggie Dovahkiin

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    To you, the individual slot player, the number really means nothing and thats for two main reasons:

    A) You aren't going to sit at ONE machine and play through hundreds of thousands or maybe even millions of spins. I say one machine because thats the only way to realize a machine's payback - to put in some long term play on it.

    B) Its an averaged out number covering a lot of machines. As an example you could be standing on the casino floor with two machines right in front of you and one is set to 85% payback and the one next to it is 95% payback... together the two average to 90% but you would have no way of knowing which machine is which by just looking at them.

    It depends on the machine. A machine's payback fluctuates based on how many credits it gives out versus how much it takes in - thats why you can sit at a machine and possibly win something and then another machine just sucks your money up... if that happens it doesn't mean the machine you won on has a 150% payback and the one that you lost your money on has a 5% payback.

    Also it depends on how often a machine gets played. Like if "long term" meant 100,000 spins for a hot new video slot that could represent a week's worth of play... for an old three reel slot machine sitting in a dark back corner with little to no foot traffic around that area that could take a year or more to get that much play.

    But as a general rule of thumb: for a classic style three reel machine "long term" would usually mean 80,000 to 150,000 spins and for a video slot it would probably be in the area of 10,000,000 to 25,000,000 spins (of which some video slots may never realize their long term if they aren't popular enough to get played).

    A really simple way to look at it would be like:
    If you had $100,000 and played a slot machine at $1 per spin for 100,000 spins... if it had a 90% payback you would expect that through play at the end you would have about $90,000 left.

    But in reality its more complex than that: you might put $20 in a machine and betting 50 cents a spin you might play that $20 through many times and possibly even still leave up - IE: you could put in $20, hit a big win on the first spin and cash out at $50... or you could keep playing and playing and through a bunch of little wins you end up cashing out at your initial $20 buy in, but you just had $200 worth of play through - just that because you cycled your winnings through the machine over and over again and played through until you broke even doesn't mean that machine has a 100% payback.
     
  3. cap7557

    cap7557 Tourist

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    I'll post this for what it's worth since I was writing at the same time as Auggie ...

    If I understand, the length of the "long run" varies depending on the game characteristics. A game with huge jackpot potential would require more time to converge to the expected return percentage.

    For table games, there are two distinct types of measurement. The "house edge" is the percentage retained from each wager, typically 1 to 5%, according to the source I consulted. The "hold" is the percentage retained from the buy-in amount, typically 15 to 50%.

    In your slot machine example, the house edge is 10%, and in part (a), the house retains 10% of the $100,000 total amount wagered.

    Part (b) refers to the hold, but it's a concept that doesn't really exist and isn't calculated for slot machines.
     
  4. tringlomane

    tringlomane STP Addicted Beer Snob

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    Generally not. But I have seen some slot machine hold statistics with Illinois's new "Video Gaming Terminals" for bars/restaurants/truck stops. I believe they can do this because these units are "cash in"/"ticket out" machines only. For July, the "house edge" for these units statewide was 7.78% and the "hold" was 28.2%.

    But it's best for the OP to remember that the 10% figure applies to each spin. So every spin of a dollar means the house would expect to win 10 cents as the average result. So if we spun the machine one million times at a dollar each, then we would expect the house to win $1,000,000 x 10% = $100,000.
     
  5. face12313

    face12313 Tourist

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    yes~I think this is the B way~casino will take all cash.
     
  6. face12313

    face12313 Tourist

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    yes, if b is real,then I think the "long run" is "one spin"
     
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