1. Welcome to VegasMessageBoard
    It appears you are visiting our community as a guest.
    In order to view full-size images, participate in discussions, vote in polls, etc, you will need to Log in or Register.

Meat Choices

Discussion in 'Restaurants & Buffets' started by nursepower, Feb 24, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. nursepower

    nursepower Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    338
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    3
    Help a girl out. All I know about meat is I normally order the filet mignon well done. What is the difference in these cuts? We are going to Prime one night and I've had the porterhouse and liked it but are any of these others like "WOW"?

    Filet Mignon
    Beef Short Rib,
    Bone-In Rib Eye,
    Dry-Aged Bone-In Rib Eye
    Porterhouse
    Peppercorn New York Steak
     
  2. Royal Flusher

    Royal Flusher Savvy Gambler

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Messages:
    5,505
    Location:
    Flusherville, Canada
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    57
    Interesting questions. Never been to Prime but maybe I can help a bit. Anyone, if I make a mistake, please correct me - not an expert steak guy like some here.

    First off, unless it is a deal breaker, try ordering your meat with some pink in it - medium or medium well. Once things get well done they get tougher and drier. I'm a medium-rare guy myself.

    Filet mignon - very tender but not much fat in it which means two things, better for you, but less flavor. I often choose this.
    Beef Short Rib - not sure about this one, would this be braised short ribs? I wouldn't order it.
    Bone-in Rib Eye - The Rib Eye is my favorite steak. Having the bone in adds flavor because the meat right next to the bone is the most flavorful.
    Dry Aged Bone-In - all meat is aged, dry aged means it's going to be a bit funky, and a little drier and more tender - some people love that funky flavor. Some say that the time you should serve a steak is when it is aged to the point just before it rots. I'm not so sure about this... :)
    Peppercorn New York Steak - Almost as flavorful as the rib eye, because lots of yummy marbled fat. Not as tender though. I think the NY is the outer part of the rib eye, so no filet meat in there. The peppercorn part refers to a sauce they're gonna put on it made with
    Porterhouse - it's got the t-bone thing happening in it. Part of the porterhouse is filet mignon - the part closest to the bone in the short part of the 'T'. And the part on the other side of the bone is a strip steak, also known as a New York steak. It's three steaks in one!!! These are fatty flavorful steaks. Yumsters.
    peppercorns. Or could refer to a peppercorn spice rub. When it comes to steak, keep it simple. New Yorks are usually smaller than rib eyes. And lower cut New Yorks are what you'll see with steak and eggs.

    So, if it were me, I'd choose either the filet medium rare, or the bone in rib eye medium rare. Or the porterhouse medium rare.

    Okay do I have to choose one?

    Bone in rib eye.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  3. UTE

    UTE Plastics

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2011
    Messages:
    1,699
    Location:
    Salt Lake/Las Vegas
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    0
    I was appalled when I first met my wife and she would order a good steak well done. Why order a good cut and then cook the flavor out of it? Over the years my wife started trying bites of my medium-rare and rare steaks. She realized how much better they tasted. Now, if we're out at a restaurant with good quality beef, she orders medium rare.

    Bill
     
  4. abrolsma

    abrolsma Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    19
    My wife not only orders it well done but insists on asking for ketchup.. so we aren't welcome at most steakhouses anymore.

    To the OP question - I think RF nailed the important parts. Most time the filet is wrapped in bacon or cooked in some sort of fat (like copious amounts of butter) to account for the low fat content. I think your safest bet is the filet. If you want a little more than the bone in rib eye.
     
  5. klawrey

    klawrey High-Roller

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2012
    Messages:
    705
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    9
    Not to mention some steak places will give out the lesser quality or meat they need to get rid of for "well done" orders.Why not if they're gonna cook the crap out of it! We have a steak house here that the chef refuses to cook certain steaks anything more than medium. Probably not the best way for him to go about it but he is adamant.

    I'm a medium-rare guy myself and prefer either a good bone-in ribeye or filet.
     
  6. nursepower

    nursepower Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    338
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    3
    I just have a thing with the blood on my plate. lol....When we go to Bonefish they always have to butterfly my filet.
     
  7. Royal Flusher

    Royal Flusher Savvy Gambler

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Messages:
    5,505
    Location:
    Flusherville, Canada
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    57
    It's not blood.



    It's meaty goodness.

    Yeah, that is not that uncommon. Well, maybe medium well wouldn't be too juicy? If it is you're gonna have to stick with well done, or start learning to love the meaty goodness. Let us know what happens!
     
  8. tom.mckenzie

    tom.mckenzie Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2014
    Messages:
    134
    Location:
    Harrisonburg, VA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    50
    I had a stroke a little over 2 years ago, so I rarely eat red meat anymore. If I do, it's going to be a ribeye. And bone-in ribeyes are even better. The drawback is that they are fattier than the filet - the flavor comes from the fat and the bone.

    And I'm definitely a medium rare guy for steaks, with rare for prime rib or roast beef. I used to get them medium well or even well done, but you definitely get more of the flavor when they're cooked a little less. Of course, it's your appetite and your money, so eat them any way you please!!!
     
  9. dmr

    dmr Registered Abuser

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    4,640
    Location:
    Somewhere in Middle America
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    70
    My fave steak is Filet Mignon medium-rare. It's juicy, but not what I call bloody. If you can get a bone-in filet in a sensible portion size, it's one of the more flavorful ones. Some of them, however, do the bone-in filets in ridiculously-large sizes.
     
  10. hammie

    hammie VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,372
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    5
    Father in law grew up on a farm, everything was well done, I don't think they he had a freezer back then. So my wife does not appreciate it when I say "it's already dead, why kill it again?"

    I love a good Skirt Steak with chimichurri at an Argentinian steak house; I found one out on Long Island, their steak is almost a cubit long.

    At home we are big on London Broil, marinate for an hour or two, grill and slice thin. Just need to make half well done!

    Eat at dimly lit places and ask them to serve it on a piece of toast, it will absorb the juice. It's not blood by the way, how come chicken and pork are white? The blood is drained out during processing.
     
  11. dmr

    dmr Registered Abuser

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    4,640
    Location:
    Somewhere in Middle America
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    70
    My fave steak is Filet Mignon medium-rare. It's juicy, but not what I call bloody. If you can get a bone-in filet in a sensible portion size, it's one of the more flavorful ones. Some of them, however, do the bone-in filets in ridiculously-large sizes.
     
  12. Joe

    Joe VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    Messages:
    11,314
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    175
    Porterhouse, bone-in ribeye, boneless ribeye and prime rib in that order. All ordered rare!
    My wife mirrors UTE's comments. She started out well-done and now just like me, she orders rare.
     
    Christmas
  13. dmr

    dmr Registered Abuser

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2011
    Messages:
    4,640
    Location:
    Somewhere in Middle America
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    70
    Prime rib is probably my favorite all-around meat dish. If you have an aversion to that which is sanguine, you might not like it since it's best served rare. ("If it's well done, it ain't prime rib!")

    Jerry's Nugget, Billy Bob's, and Prime Rib Loft come to mind immediately for great prime rib in LV.
     
  14. Bubbavegas

    Bubbavegas VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,446
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    21
    Dry Aged Bone In Ribeye is my go to without question, after that is one not on the list is a NY Strip, unlike the Ribeye the Strip shows a cook can do it right with a lesser cut of meat
     
    Cosmo Christmas
  15. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    15,189
    Location:
    Central California Coast
    I'm an equal opportunity eater of cowproduct, though I do run in cycles. Rib steaks for a while, then strip loin, I'm all over sirloin if it is USDA Prime. We don't order braised short ribs out often but make them here all the time. Terri does prime rib; it's kinda lost on me. I seldom order filet; yet we are all over a roasted tenderloin at home.

    Cow, it's not just for dinner!

    We're both rare-ies. (And if a steak sits properly after coming off the heat it won't make the flooding Red River of the Plate.)
     
  16. hawki39

    hawki39 Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2015
    Messages:
    151
    Location:
    NE PA....coal region
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    2
    Before my wife was my wife, many years ago, we'd go camping on vacation. We always had a steak night. I'd get 1.5" Filet Mignons hand cut from a good Butcher. She'd always insist on hers being cooked well done. IT BROKE MY HEART to do that to that steak!!! I then devised a plan where I'd start dinner later so I'd serve the cooked meal in the dark. :licklips:
    My wife noticed the better taste. She finally got wise when she couldn't finish her steak and wrapped up the leftover piece. She spied the pink the next day and was not amused.
    I have finally gotten her to enjoy a properly cooked chunk of steer. I have her at medium, leaning slightly to medium rare.
     
  17. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    15,189
    Location:
    Central California Coast
    lol

    My conversion came in high school. My parents moved so I bunked with friends, and Tom (the dad) had one rule -- you eat what is put in front of you. That's when I went from killed eggs and steaks to runny eggs and rare meat. Thank you, Tom!

    Growing up, Sunday night dinner was roasted prime rib at my grandparents' place. They thought meat had two colors -- charcoal on the outside, cadaver gray in the middle. But the gravy was wicked good.
     
  18. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    15,189
    Location:
    Central California Coast
    Tonight's rib steak:

    IMG_1033.jpg
     
  19. kitson

    kitson VIP Whale

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2004
    Messages:
    1,881
    thanks, ken!

    good to get supplies off the front end. getting next years steaks on the ground for ya right now!

    so, what's the juice for tonight?
     
  20. 4Eyes

    4Eyes Low-Roller

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    175
    Location:
    CA
    Trips to Las Vegas:
    83
    That is the perfect steak for the "Pittsburgh Rare" aka "Black and Blue" treatment: charred on the outside, cool/red on the inside. Yum!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.