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Limit Texas Hold Em practise?

Discussion in 'The Poker Room' started by Corinne, Nov 21, 2015.

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  1. Corinne

    Corinne Low-Roller

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    After my first lesson in Limit Hold Em at Mirage a few weeks ago I have been looking for an App or a website where I can get advice and practise. I can't really find anything. I did the lesson on my own with a really nice guy at Mirage who was very helpful and explained in detail. Unfortunately when I actually played the game I was pretty useless! Luckily everyone there on the 3:6 table were very accommodating and really nice. They knew they were going to beat me and that didn't bother me, I just wanted to have a go. I said straight away I hadn't played before and if anyone had difficulty with me asking questions and was very annoying then I would be happy to leave. No problem at all and the dealer very kindly had a lot of patience and the other players were more than helpful. In fact we all had a really good laugh for an hour or so. I really enjoyed it but don't really want to make a complete idiot of myself a second time.

    Anyone know a good source online where I can get to play for free and learn as I go?

    Thanks guys.
     
  2. bigalbr

    bigalbr VIP Whale

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    Learning poker is more of a book thing than a trainer thing, You need to find a book that tells you what you need to do in each situation. I'd recommend Small Stakes Holdem by Ed Miller, David Sklansky, and Mason Malmuth. It's old, but 2/4 limit has the same characters it always did. I've played a lot of poker simulations, and if you have half a clue you always end up with all the money. That's not how it works in real life.
     
  3. Corinne

    Corinne Low-Roller

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    Thanks, just ordered a second hand one from Amazon. £4.50 ($6.50). That will be a good start.
     
  4. bta15

    bta15 Tourist

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    Sign up for a poker training website. I'm not sure which ones specialized in LHE but maybe start with deuces cracked.

    Play online for microstakes, it's good practice. Don't play for play money cuz nobody takes it seriously.
     
  5. TRN

    TRN High-Roller

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    Any of the apps/sites that allow online gambling let you play free too (e.g. PokerStars) - download, install, create an account, and play the Play Money games. Every game they offer in 'real money' they also offer in play money. I play/practice on PokerStars occasionally (in the US it's play money only, no real money allowed). It isn't as good as real experience with real money on the line, but it teaches you the theory and rules.
     
  6. Auggie

    Auggie Dovahkiin

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    The first thing I would suggest is: get rid of the "I was going to lose/they knew they were going to beat me" attitude - anybody can win at any time, it might as well be you.

    As long as you have the basic fundamentals of how to play and can pick your spots you should be able to take down a few pots and as long as you don't do anything stupid to give back your winnings you can give yourself a good chance to come out ahead.

    For the fundamentals I would pick up a book on limit poker. There are a few to choose from, you don't want one that is nothing but the math of the game, mostly just one that covers the fundamentals. And I would then leave it at one book - the best thing you can do is practice and learn by playing, not just read and read and read some more, once you have the basics down you should use that to build your game upon and through practice you will figure out what works and what doesn't.

    Some quick tips I would offer:

    Pay attention: whether you are in a pot or not you should watch what the others are doing and any time you can see the other cards (at show down, if they flash the table, etc) then pay attention so you can get an idea of what they are playing.

    Just because people raise, it doesn't mean they have anything. There are some that will just raise preflop with anything to try and chase everybody out, others can't enter a pot, with whatever they are playing, without it being a raise. This works with the first point because if you get to see their cards from time to time and can see what they are playing it lets you know if their raises mean anything or if its just some guy who pushes with any two.

    Know some of the basic odds. There are lots of websites that will tell you the odds of making a flush draw or an open ended straight draw, etc. If you know the odds you can figure out if its a good call or not to hang around - if you have a good flush draw and its $6 to call in to a $65 pot then you are easily getting the odds to make that call... but if its $6 to call in to a $15 pot to chase your flush draw then you wouldn't be getting the odds to chase your draw.

    But on that note, think about if your cards can hurt you: if you have an open ended straight draw against 3 players, you are holding 9/10 on a board of JQ4, you really only have the 8 as a good out: the King will complete your straight as well, but it can put you in a bad spot because its pretty easy to see somebody else playing A/10 or having a redraw to a better straight. That doesn't mean fold if a king comes up, but it might mean don't go stomping on the gas with your betting.

    Know what is a good flop and what is a bad flop, as an example: any flop with all three cards being ten or higher is a dangerous flop - somebody is probably going to have the nuts and somebody is probably going to be stupid and think his top pair is best and it'll just pump up the pot, which can cost you a lot of money if you aren't the one with the nuts.
    On the other hand: if you have a small pair, like a pair of threes or fours, and with some heavy preflop betting go in to the flop with three other players and the cards come 257 its probably pretty good chance that the other players all have big cards and your threes are good. Thats a situation where you might want to jam the betting to chase others out of the pot and try to isolate the one guy who doesn't know how to fold AK/AQ.


    All that said, I would go with the book you've selected, learn the basics of the game and then set up an account on one of the poker sites and play either some free play money games or even just put in a few bucks and play some low stakes games to get a feel for whats what and how to play - a site like PokerStars, as an example, has lots of 2c/4c and 5c/10c limit hold 'em games running all the time where you can play either 6 or 10 handed if you want to go with real money games or 10/20 and up in the play money games.
     
  7. Corinne

    Corinne Low-Roller

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    Great advice there. You guys are so helpful. Thanks a lot. Maybe winter won't be quite so boring this year if I have a little project.
     
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