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Job in Vegas?? Relocating from the East Coast

Discussion in 'Living in Sin (City that is)' started by Woman2Blame, Feb 13, 2014.

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  1. Woman2Blame

    Woman2Blame Tourist

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    I'm sure it's been asked 572839754328 times here...but what is the job market like in Vegas? My husband and I would like to relocate to Vegas (from the East Coast) towards the end of this year. The problem with being on the East coast is that we can only do phone or Skype interviews....might make it a little harder to get jobs.

    So what's the job market like out there? I'm a sales admin....basically supporting a group of sales people, with some HR duties as well. My husband works in retail managment for a large chain store, but he wants to get into some other form of sales or marketing (something with more regular hours), etc. Once we are residents in LV, I'd like to finish my degree at UNLV, so I personally wouldn't mind taking some sort of part time, entry level type job at a restaurant or casino....something that has flexible hours for a full time student. Is there a lot of competition for these type of jobs (waitress, cocktail waitress, bartender, etc)?

    My husband wouldn't mind taking something that pays a tad less than he makes now, since the cost of living is cheaper out there....I just have no idea what the market is like for people looking for sales jobs.

    :peace:
     
  2. DaleU

    DaleU Tourist

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    Just do a search on Craigslist for Las Vegas, I think that would give you an idea of the job market, JMO

    Good luck,
     
  3. TomTWI

    TomTWI High-Roller

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    My niece and her husband relocated a couple years ago. She went first and found a job fairly quickly because she had experience in medical billing. After she was set up with insurance he came out and it took him well over a year to find a job because he was a machinist so was changing careers. I have heard that many employers will not hire new residents,( less than 12 months) unless there is some type of rare skill involved. Make sure you have something lined up before you make the move or at least a large nest egg to live on while you look.

    TomTWI
     
  4. Woman2Blame

    Woman2Blame Tourist

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    Wow, that must have been so stressful to be unemployed for a year! I wonder why they won't hire new residents
     
  5. TomTWI

    TomTWI High-Roller

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    Because so many people think they will like Las Vegas and don't make it a year or the first summer. Companies don't want to invest in training and have you leave right away. Las Vegas is one of the most transient cities.

    TomTWI
     
  6. vegasbound

    vegasbound Moderator

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    Las Vegas is very transient, however, I disagree that employers will not hire new residents. That is absolutely untrue in my experiences with the construction industry and casinos. My husband and I have worked for both for nearly eleven years. My husband has been responsible for hiring for the past five. He seeks individuals that are upbeat and positive. A good attitude will get you further than experience and length of residence isn't a concern. There is truth to employer's not taking the time to respond to those out of state. Thousands express interest in living in Las Vegas, hundreds actually try, and fewer make it their first year or two, and even fewer stay more than five. It's also true that getting hired can be a catch 22 because you need gaming or health card to qualify for a position, but you need employment to apply for cards.

    There are jobs available but you need to be flexible and willing to work (it seems simple but it's shocking how many are not). For a good sampling of what's available check websites for various casinos, major employers like Zappos or Cox, CCSD, LVVWD, construction companies, etc. Almost all post openings/reqs online. Even area restaurants have job listing on their websites. Bartending/Waitressing is highly sought after, at least at prime spots on and off strip. Not saying there aren't opportunities but they are competitive and most will start as extra board and/or with the least desirable shifts.
     
  7. Woman2Blame

    Woman2Blame Tourist

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    Thank you for the suggesstions! We'll be sure to check out those companies.
    Ideally, I would really like to try working in a casino. I have some cutsomer service experience from back when I worked in retail, as does my husband. For the past few years, I've been in HR/staffing. I found a few jobs on the CET website that I think I would qualify for, if I stick in HR.

    How do I get a job that requires a gaming or health card, without already having either? Do I just hope that I can find an employer who will give someone with no casino/restaurant experience a shot?

    :peace:
     
  8. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

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    On matters housing and for the big picture on employment, Kellee is a boon to folks here, a wealth of info, as she is for other Vegas matters, too. She and hubby are among that lucky slice of transplants who made the move a success and love being in Vegas.

    Here's my take on relocation: Relocation can be a very good thing. Some move for a new climate or setting and find a way to make it work from an employment perspective, some move for a new career opportunity and find out it also was a boon in terms of the new locale. Some combine both. There's a type of move I'd avoid, however, the one made through the perspective of vacation-tinted lenses.

    Money seems the key. I'd have a nice big reserve in savings that you can tap and be able to handle it disappearing if during the process of getting re-established it disappears. This isn't your nest egg, your retirement package, this is discretionary savings.

    Good luck with the new venture!!
     
  9. Patripman

    Patripman Low-Roller

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    I always found it to be beneficial to use a companies website directly to post or send cover letters and resumes for jobs. I will use Indeed, Careerbuilder and Monster for reference to search for open positions but all these companies do is refer your information and whether that information actually makes it to the company or is up for debate. In Pennsylvania if a resident goes on unemployment it is mandatory that they create an account with cover letter and resume on the Jobs Gateway website with 30 days of benefits being paid. I was told by many people including recruiters and HR managers that seeing a resume sent by Jobs Gateway is red flagged for a person who is unemployed.

    So my suggestion to anyone searching for employment is to use the employers or company website to send your information. I also use Gmail with a receipt request so I know it at least made it to the right person.

    p
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2014
  10. suecasey

    suecasey Low-Roller

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    Don't worry about not having a gaming or health card ahead of time. What happens is that first you are offered the job by the casino. Then you go to HR to do the paperwork. They will give you instructions on how to get the needed cards. If you are working in food & beverage, you will need to go to the health department offices to get a health card. If you are working in the casino, you will need to go to one of various police locations to be finger-printed and get a gaming card. You may need a "TAM" card (alcohol awareness), which requires a half-day class. Meanwhile, the casino does a background check on you.

    As a rewards center representative, I needed a gaming card and a TAM card (because we sometimes gave away wine/beer). They are good for 4-5 years. You need to pay a fee to get them.

    But you can't get them before being offered a job.
     
  11. Woman2Blame

    Woman2Blame Tourist

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    Thank you for that information!! Did you have a hard time find a job at a casino? Do they usually require previous gaming experience?
     
  12. suecasey

    suecasey Low-Roller

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    I had no previous experience working in a casino. I had LOTS of previous experience as a casino customer, though, and I knew a lot about promotions and comps. I was applying for a low-paying, part-time job as a promotions clerk, just to get my foot in the door. I was 66 at the time, and retired, and this is an ideal job for a person in that situation. It was fun, and more important, it eventually evolved into working in the rewards center booth. :)
     
  13. Woman2Blame

    Woman2Blame Tourist

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    That's great - thanks Sue! Like you, I would also be looking for part-time. I'm a full time student, and would like to finish my degree at UNLV once we move. So I'm just looking for something around 20 hours a week so I can keep up with school. I think I would enjoy doing something in customer service or hospitality....I currently work a boring office job, and I miss interacting with new people! :)
     
  14. suecasey

    suecasey Low-Roller

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    Most of the entry-level jobs at casinos are "on-call" jobs. This means that your work schedule will not be consistent. You'll work different hours on different days, and this can vary from week to week. This could be a problem depending on your school schedule. During 5 years as an "on-call," I worked anywhere from 12 hours in a week to as much as 40 hours, lol. I could not make plans for anything in advance, because we got our schedules only a week ahead of time.
     
  15. 3cats

    3cats High-Roller

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    Don't be afraid to use temp agencies. They are a great way to get your foot in the door as well as experience different types of companies.
    Just a thought.

    3cats
     
  16. Woman2Blame

    Woman2Blame Tourist

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    I work for a temp agency now, actually! Internally, not as a temp. :) Very familiar with the process and would definitely take a temp job to get my foot in the door with a company....but after doing a quick search online, it looks like temp agencies are not as popular in Vegas as they are in other parts of the country. I didn't see very many agencies, and the few that I did see weren't advertising many jobs. I assume that because of the high unemployment rate, that temp agencies might have a hard time staying in business and gaining customers....but I don't know. If anyone out there has some insight on the temp market in Vegas, I'd appreciate the info :)
     
  17. Nick61

    Nick61 High-Roller

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    Check out the poster 3Cats here, she's very knowledgeable about Vegas real estate.
     
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