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Interesting Perspective from Host Side of the Equation

Discussion in 'Comps' started by Horsesrus, Nov 16, 2012.

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  1. Horsesrus

    Horsesrus Tourist

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  2. tacallian

    tacallian Low-Roller

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    It's a very well written astute piece of text. He does a good job of outlining exactly what the casino's have done that has in at least some respect changed Vegas IMO. And to look at the idea of the experience versus the numbers is very appealing. That's how I was introduced to Vegas by my parents only 2 years ago. They had created an entire experience around all kinds of different events.

    It's a difficult balance though. It will be very easy to develop a bizarre unique experience for a high roller because of the value involved. But try that with someone who's just gotten into host territory and it becomes more difficult.
     
  3. mike_m235

    mike_m235 Tourist

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    Hosts that actually did stuff like that would do well. Some people will still comp shop. But I believe that most mid tier players really want a host who gives a crap, and would take slightly less if they had it.

    I could give hosts some tips that would greatly increase their player satisfaction for no cost.

    1. Return my email. Today. Nothing says I don't care like slow communication. I know you're busy -- but you're not too busy to drop me an acknowledgement and a promise to get back to me tomorrow.

    2. Don't offer me stuff I don't want. When I've told you that I never come to Vegas over the holidays and you offer me a new years party, you're clearly not listening. Not listening = not caring.

    3. Ask what it is that I really want. If you can't do it, tell me what you can do that's similar. If the customer wants UFC tickets, but hasn't earned them, offer to reserve a table at a sports bar that's playing the fights with $75 in comped drinks. Or whatever. Make an effort.

    Just a thought. Loyalty goes two ways.
     
  4. Nevyn

    Nevyn VIP Whale

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    Its pretty much nonsense, imho.

    The nature of the relationship never really changed, it just went from a seller's market to a buyer's market.

    They didn't accidentally make a mistake and kill a golden goose by offering comps. There were just way more gaming options than players to fill them, giving the players more leverage to dictate terms.

    The players still have it. Good luck to him bucking the trend by offering personalized experiences. An expectation's been built now.
     
  5. Chuck2009x

    Chuck2009x VIP Whale

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    About all that article tells me is that the guy doesn't have as much FP to give out as he did a year ago.

    Why didn't he just answer the player's question? Boom. Done.
     
  6. oc_guy

    oc_guy Low-Roller

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    What a horrible thought to think that casinos actually have to compete for a consumers business. It's not like that in any other industry! Poor hosts :rolleyes2:
     
  7. maximus56k

    maximus56k Tourist

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    "Raving Consultants" telling the casinos they are naughty.
     
  8. jhpa

    jhpa High-Roller

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    I am not sure I see the whole point to his story...

    So he feels it is more honorable to offer a player front row tickets to Willie Nelson and a backstage meet-and-greet instead of $500 in free play. So maybe that particular player would rather have the willie nelson evening. It is good salesmanship to know that and a smart move to offer it.

    Further, it is smart of a particular casino to corner the market on a certain perk - like hiring willie nelson and only offering the experience to their own customers. Of course, this has a cost to the house. So the casino will need to determine that there are enough high rollers to make this a good value proposition. Assuming there is, I think this is pretty cool. And it shows the house is being creative and not being lazy by just writing a check. .

    But at the end of the day, it is still just a matter of one form of "currency" versus another. Offer that same willie nelson fan $100,000 and willie will be standing by himself backstage. To quote the old punchline "we already know what kind of woman you are, now we are negotiating the price."

    People value things at different levels. Things that are "priceless" really are not priceless. Every "thing", every experience, has a price that an individual will put on it. Anything can be used as currency. If anything has changed, it is simply the increasing willingness of casinos to offer cash as another form of currency.

    So instead of the young woman getting a fur or a gold necklace, now she is getting cash. Does it change what she is?
     
  9. mike_m235

    mike_m235 Tourist

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    But I think there are things that probably have more value than what they cost the casino, and that's where putting a non cash offer out there can have benefit.

    Like a room, as the simplest example. That room they comp me is worth more to me than it costs them to provide it. It can work that way with other things, as well. Sure, the concert ticket I want may have only cost $150 the day it went on sale. But I didn't buy it, the show sold out, and now it's reselling for $450. But if the casino held back some at $150, which was all they would have sold it for anyway, they're now offering me something that's worth $450 at a cost of only $150 to them.

    Quite simply, there are things they can do cheaper than I could do them for myself. And a creative host could use that to 'buy' his customers at a lower price to his employer.
     
  10. C0usineddie

    C0usineddie VIP Whale

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    I get his point.

    My company has gone the same way, giving away a product we used to sell for a high price thus devaluing the whole experience.

    Then they wonder why sales fall off. The reason is because they decided to give the stuff away when the customers were perfectly happy paying for it.

    Now they are stuck and have to change course. Casinos are good at this. They change lots faster then a large business does.

    Thats why I like casinos so much.
     
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