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I feel for you people dealing with a family member with Alzheimers

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by jerseyguy, Jan 29, 2015.

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  1. jerseyguy

    jerseyguy VIP Whale

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    Esp. if you have to care for them at home. The other night a lady down the street wandered out in her robe at 2am and started banging on peoples doors.
    My one neighbor thought it was a burglar so they hid in the closet and dialed 911.
    She then went across the street to the guy next to me whose dog barked and woke them up. Police showed up and took her to hospital.
    Could have been much worse, it was 15 degrees with ice all over,if she fell, forget it .
    Not the first time she did something like this ,hubby takes it in stride.
    Scary, could be any one of us some day.
     
  2. Funkhouser

    Funkhouser In Charge of the Big Door

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    Yup, Alsheimers :), Oldtimers, and Alzheimer's are all terrible degenerative and debilitating diseases.

    I feel for people dealing with this. Friend at my wife's work has a husband in early stages, guy is in his late 50's. Pretty much their retirement is gonna be wiped out
    and the stress and worry over him burning down the house, leaving the fridge open from late night wandering around the house, forgetting old friends and memories is taking its toll on her.

    I told my wife, if that happens to me, I am pulling the plug myself. Slowly dying or suffering from a disease like that is expensive in America. Thats why we need good healthcare reform and some
    kind of safety net for people like this.
     
  3. Joe Strummer

    Joe Strummer VIP Whale

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    My maternal grandmother had Alzheimer's ---
    But back then......it didn't have a name .
    I was a kid in the sixties + grandma would come live with us.
    I guess, she rotated staying,between siblings.
    *
    As I said, there was no name for it.
    My mother tried to expain it to us - "Oxygen, gets restricted, and cut off from her brain."
    Okay, that was explaination enough.
    *
    However, trying to reason with her while she was in a dementia episode WAS diffulcult.
    She would not listen to us (kids ).
    She would turn off all the electicity ( to save money, of course ).
    She would ramble on about "who's house this is....Matt + I bought it from Frank Wilcox...etc. "
    And she would wonder outside.....once in a while.
    One episode :
    She went to our neighbors to complain about ( me ?)...cos i was trying to reason with her.
    I had to follow her to their door.....it was painful....not having your beloved grandma in her right mind.
    The woman neighbor was a nurse...and saw me....she understood...and did her best to send grandma home.
    *
    Man, back then....doctor's were just starting research on it.
    I remember, my mother trying to read ANYTHING about it.....not much in print.
    *
    It's a tough thing to watch.
     
  4. DaiLun

    DaiLun R.C., L.C., and A.A.N.G.

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    Not Alzheimer's, but mild dementia.

    My 88 year old Dad had complications during an AAA (Abdominal Aorta Anuerysm) stent procedure 5 years ago. My Mom passed away 3 years ago.

    Many bad things happened during that procedure including:

    loss of kidney function (massive blood loss)
    heart attack
    loss of blood to the brain

    He spent 30 days in ICU and the Drs. (with the exception of the surgeon who worked on him) wrote him off several times.

    He has now cheated death several times, but I wonder if it was all worth it.

    He now suffers from short term memory issues. I recently had to ask him to surrender the car keys because of his memory issues.

    He has to go to dialysis 3 time a week. I have to take him because if I don't he will refuse to go. I am fortunate that my job allows me to take my lunch hour off at odd times.

    I am also the single parent of a 13 year old, who is old enough to take care of his Grandpa overnight but I can't let him go for more than a day.

    I know that he's just "waiting to die", but still holding on because of his monthly pension and SS checks. I am just trying to make his remaining days as comfortable as possible.

    This has severely limited my trips to LV, that why some are just for the day or only overnight. I can't be gone on a dialysis day unless someone is there to make sure that he goes.

    However, this is the man who raised me, and it's only "right" that I care for him when he needs it.
     
  5. marcianofan

    marcianofan Low-Roller

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    That last line is so true, and if you go by the numbers it will happen to many of us here on VMB .
     
  6. Sonya

    Sonya Queen of VMB

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    Back in the 90s when my fiance got lung cancer, we moved into his grandparents' home. His grandmother had some pretty serious dementia and was living next door, but couldn't remember that we were in her house. She would "escape" and wander up a couple times a day. Once I found her changing sheets on my bed. :) I told her daughter that she was welcome in the house any time she felt like cleaning. :haha:
     
  7. bswim

    bswim High-Roller

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    My grandmother had it real bad, she passed away last year. Eventually she was a zombie due to the drugs they had her on. If they took her off the drugs she got very mean and violent to everyone. 10 years prior she wouldn't even put up with anyone saying a bad word about anyone else, sweetest old lady you could imagine. I really miss my grandpa, he died about 12 years before her. Only good thing is he didn't have to watch her go downhill, that would have tore him apart. He went quickly due to his heart while watching TV.
    Her mother had it as well. I remember when I was a kid she was in a home and was about 90. They caught her climbing over the 6 foot fence to escape, all 90lbs of her.

    My mom has some friends that she has Alzheimers and has 4-5 good days followed by 2-3 bad days. Been married about 50 years and still really close. It's really hard on the husband to watch his wife fade away.
     
  8. DaiLun

    DaiLun R.C., L.C., and A.A.N.G.

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    Seeing all these Alzheimer's horror (well, not really, just sad) stories reminds me how lucky I am that my Dad "only" has mild dementia.
     
  9. Foos

    Foos Low-Roller

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    There is alot of research out there on Turmeric and memory, it is very cheap to try turmeric and it has no side effects.

    An exciting study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study explored the effects of one of turmeric’s active ingredients known as curcumin on sixty healthy adults aged sixty to eighty-five to determine whether the spice has any short- or long-term memory or cognitive effects.

    Conducted at the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, researches assessed the mental effects of curcumin supplementation after one hour, three hours, and four weeks. They conducted multiple tests to determine whether the participants had any mood, cognitive, or blood marker effects that might indicate curcumin’s immediate or long-term effects. In just one hour after taking the supplement the participants showed significant performance improvement on memory and attention tasks compared to the placebo group.

    The participants had many impressive results after four weeks of treatment with curcumin as well. The scientists indicated that working memory, energy levels, calmness and contentedness (as measures of mood), and even fatigue induced by psychological stress were significantly improved following the long-term treatment with the supplement. Participants also had lower cholesterol levels after taking the curcumin supplement.

    Even Alzheimer’s patients with severe symptoms, including dementia, irritability, agitation, anxiety, and apathy, showed excellent therapeutic results when taking curcumin in a study published in the Japanese medical journal Ayu. When participants took 764 mg of turmeric with a standardized amount of 100 mg/day of curcumin for twelve weeks, they “started recovering from these symptoms without any adverse reaction in the clinical symptom and laboratory data.” After three months of treatment the patients’ symptoms and their reliance on caregivers significantly decreased. After one year of treatment two of the patients recognized their family members when they were unable to do so at the outset of the study. In one of the cases the person had a 17 percent improvement on their Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score.

    The study results were achieved using a brand of curcumin called Longvida; however there are many other excellent brands. Ideally choose a standardized extract of curcumin. Follow package directions. Consult your physician prior to taking curcumin.

    http://www.puritan.com/puritans-pride-brand-0102/tumeric-curcumin-450-mg-015418?scid=31789
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015
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  10. vwhiten

    vwhiten High-Roller

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    I know how you feel. I have an 84 y.o mother with moderate dementia. She has fallen multiple times - broken both hips, had a ruptured diverticulum was in the hospital almost one month - bowel resection, colostomy - almost died. But she always seems to rally - During this time she developed severe paranoia and my husband takes the brunt of this. She used to adore him - now everything is his fault. She accuses him of taking all her things (bras, socks, curlers, hearing aids etc.). I always find her things in a cubby hole hiding place in her room but she still insists he did it. I work about 50 hours a week on night shift -- I go to bed after her breakfast but have to set my alarm to get her lunch. My husband would gladly do more - but she thinks he is the "devil" so he just tries to keep clear. She doesn't even realize that he has put his life on hold and passed up several jobs so that our schedule can accomodate her care. She can get to the bathroom by herself and dress herself. She is a huge fall risk and I do catch her trying to get down the front steps out on to the sidewalk occasionally.

    I am trying to keep her out of the nursing home. I am blessed in some ways that I am a nurse and the care she needs is something I do almost every day. But sometimes I really don't want to be a nurse 24/7. She does get tearful at times and doesn't want to be a burden. I tell her that she provided for me for 19 years - I have been doing this about 8 - I told her I owe her at least eleven more years. She has been near death a few times and I tease her that she is like a cat with nine lives. One of my friends said years ago when she cared for her elderly father that it is an honor and a privilege to care for an elderly parent - and it is also exhausting.
     
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  11. LV_Bound

    LV_Bound VIP Whale

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    I know someone whose wife had it (and recently passed).
    He would say that they call this disease the "long goodbye".
    Very sad.
     
  12. mikenhe

    mikenhe VIP Whale

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    Foos - thanks for that on turmeric - very interesting. I've forwarded it to my father who is taking my mother to the doctors for further tests next week. She has never had a good memory but its getting far worse. no diagnosis yet but dementia type issues are merging. short term memory getting worse.
    they spent xmas with us and I can see its worse than a year ago - same questions over and over in a short span of time but the long term memory is still there.

    its not all bad news though - she thought she did really well with presents on xmas day - I just gave her the same one five times!
     
  13. dean_1492

    dean_1492 High-Roller

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  14. Foos

    Foos Low-Roller

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    Coconut oil is also a cure for Candida.
    The world is full of treatments and cures that you will never hear about because the pharmaceutical companies can't make billions from them as they do with patented drugs.
    Google "run from the cure" The Rick Simpson Story or the Soursop fruit and learn what the AMA (American Medical Association) doesn't want you to know, it is truly eyeopening the evil that the pharmaceutical companies have perpetrated on the world.

    If you got a flu shot read this from the information sheet from Flulavel

    flu.jpg
     
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  15. jack1057

    jack1057 Low-Roller

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    So strange how it works. My MIL ended up sweet and childlike. She was so happy all the time as she regressed to her childhood. My mother on the other hand has become bitter and mean. Being around her (she is 90) is emotionally draining but we just have to remind ourselves that our Mom is not there anymore.
     
  16. Foos

    Foos Low-Roller

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    Turmeric and Coconut oil are very easy and cheap to try, even if they don't have a positive effect you have only wasted $20-40 and if they do have a positive effect was it worth $40?
     
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  17. wormhole

    wormhole Low-Roller

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    My mother was diagnosed with vascular dementia about 3 years ago, brought on by a series of TIAs. She also has MS. She is in a nursing home as my step-father's health issues won't let him take care of her at home. She still knows everyone and is not mean, but does have occasional paranoia problems in thinking people are trying to kill her or that she is not allowed to eat. Makes it real hard on the family to see her suffer.
     
  18. smartone

    smartone VIP Whale

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    Gosh, I really LOVED the stage of life when all I did was go to weddings and graduations, now (in my mid-50's) I'm going to funerals and me and all my friends are tending to aging parents. Mom's 78 and in great physical health. Dad passed-away 2 years ago at 78 and simply peacefully died in his sleep taking a nap after washing the car. He was "on the ball" right up till he wasn't. My Mom's lonely and her memory is just awful. We'll be watching a football game and she'll seem to be really into it, but will ask where they're playing like 8 times throughout the game. She lives a couple hours away and when I visit, she'll ask me many times throughout the visit when I'm going home... each time I tell her only to need to tell her again in an hour or so. She seems fine otherwise. The house is spotless and she has wonderful neighbors to keep an eye on her.

    She went back to Ohio to visit relatives for 2 months and came home and was positive someone had entered her house and put 2 bags of commercial-ice in her outside freezer. I tried to tell her, "Mom, I'm not aware of the great community burglar, who enters... puts ice in the freezer, then leaves touching nothing else." She carried on about this for a month, until we finally found out that her neighbor had a graduation party for their son and asked to store some ice at her house.

    Some of the things are funny, but others raise my concerns about her continuing to live alone.
     
  19. KellyLovesVegas

    KellyLovesVegas certified personal trainer/retired space nerd

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    We went through a similar situation with my mother-in-law last Fall. She's had early Alzheimers for three or four years, but in the last 6 months it became progressively worse until late September when we had to move her from her home into a senior living center and took away her car keys. She seems to be doing better right now - hubby took her to Lake Charles last Wednesday-Thursday and she had a great time.
     
  20. JWBlue

    JWBlue VIP Whale

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    I am convinced there will be a cure for Alzheimers. It seems like a biological disorder.
     
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