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Dual operating systems?

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by makikiboy, Jul 25, 2016.

  1. makikiboy

    makikiboy VIP Whale

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    Okay, I bought a new laptop during Black Friday (in November) but I still haven't really used it much. The main problem is that I am unable to load/run most of my software since they don't run on Windows 10. Basically I mostly use my netbook with the 11" monitor and windows 7 but that netbook was more my travelling laptop with limited hard drive and with the small screen (my new screen is 17") it is hard to use regularly.

    I'm trying to decide if I should wipe my new laptop and install windows 7 on it or if I can somehow partition the laptop into 2 different operating systems. Does anyone have 2 operating systems on their pc and how did you do it?

    My new laptop is worthless with windows 10 unless I can use all my software. (most of my "free" software cannot be run on windows 10). I configured the new laptop and ended up removing a lot of things on the window since I never will use them and I don't want them to track my activities. I rather use windows 7 since I am comfortable with it and I don't have to worry about the "bells" and "whistles" that windows 10 has.

    Any suggestions?



    There were some other posts about windows 10 but I figured to create a new thread for my problem.
     
  2. Nevyn

    Nevyn VIP Whale

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    I know it is not what you are asking, but have you tried this?

    I'd play around with compatibility mode and make sure you can't get the programs to run before messing around with dual OS.
     
  3. DaiLun

    DaiLun R.C., L.C., and A.A.N.G.

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    New Orleans 7* retreat. Food, food, and more food . . . .
    Tentatively Tahoe or LV . . . .
  4. Jerry Snuggit

    Jerry Snuggit Tourist

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    As others have said, there's Compatibility Mode, and also updating/upgrading the free programs you rely on. Unfortunately DaiLun's link shows you how to add Win 10 to computer that already runs Win 7, but you are trying to do the opposite.

    You will need actual Windows 7 installation disks. Most computers the last few years have only come with a "disk image" that isn't portable or re-installable. You can probably re-install Win 10 from the disk image on the computer it came with, but that is unlikely to work for adding Win 7.

    1) The simpler option is to open a Windows 7 Virtual Machine inside the Win 10 that is already on your computer. Download and run VirtualBox (www.virtualbox.com), create a virtual hard drive, install Windows 7 on it, then your specific programs. Now you can run Win 7, and programs on it, like any other program.

    2) If you really want to dual-boot... download GParted or another partition manager (http://www.lifehack.org/330301/best-5-free-partition-management-software-for-windows-10), create 2 primary partitions and an extended partition. Fill the extended with a logical partition. Doing it this way will allow you to keep all your photos, media, etc on the logical and have it all accessible by both OS's. Install Win 10 into primary 1 and Win 7 into primary 2. Download iReboot for an easy way to reboot from one to the other.

    Please research in more detail so you don't get stuck halfway through, these are just the starting points. You really need to understand what you're doing and the end goal, otherwise you run the risk of ending up with a computer that doesn't boot at all.
     
  5. makikiboy

    makikiboy VIP Whale

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    Thanks for the replies. Yes, I did try to run it in compatibility mode but could not get them to work. I also tried to download current versions of my software but the problem is that many of the new versions (like antivirus programs) are only good for a year and you have to purchase an upgrade every year. I won't elaborate but I have some programs that can get around the yearly expirations/upgrades but they won't work on windows 10.

    Thanks Jerry and DaiLun, I may try the virtual machine since it won't affect the current win10 OS. I do work with VM at my work place so I am probably familiar with how virtualbox works.
     
  6. Turtleman

    Turtleman VIP Whale

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    It would be impractical to suggest fixes or tricks to get unknown programs to behave on Win 10, especially programs with "modifications," but have you tried installing in the Safe Mode? I also had a few programs that wouldn't install correctly when I went from 7 to 10, and Safe Mode saved the day.

    Oh, as for dual booting, I've played with that on several occasions, mostly with XP or Win 7 with Ubuntu and with XP and Win 7, but was never happy with the results. If I remember correctly, System Restore and other backup programs only work with one OS, not both. There were a host of other issues, that thankfully, I've forgotten about! :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2016
  7. makikiboy

    makikiboy VIP Whale

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    To tell you the truth, I really don't need windows 10. I am perfectly happy with Windows 7. Unfortunately all new machines now have windows 10 installed so I wanted to keep the base windows 10 around just in case.

    As for safe mode, no, I rather have my computer work without having to finagle things, if windows 10 can't do that then I don't want it. I tried Ubuntu and it was okay but I'm more comfortable with win 7.

    Yes, there are some problems with dual O/S and system restore or backups don't work too well.

    Right now I'm avoiding the issue by using my netbook but my eyes are going batty trying to look at the 11" screen. My new laptop has a 17" screen so more comfortable so probably better to make it work to my liking instead of what Microsoft wants.
     
  8. LV_Bound

    LV_Bound VIP Whale

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    I am currently running Windows 7 (32-bit), Windows 7 (64-bit) and Linux on the same machine.
    You may have some difficultly if you only have 1 partition.
    Do check some of the replies as you should be able to get most of the stuff to work on Windows 10, but then again I do prefer Win 7 over 10 so maybe just go with the Win 7 install.
    Just do a back-up before starting.
     
  9. Jackie

    Jackie Newbie

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    Man I feel your pain..I'm an avid open-source user myself, however forced to use windows in the corporate world. If you prefer the layout of Windows 7, compared to Ubuntu, I would recommend using Linux Mint. What's cool about Linux is that most distros offer a Live CD. After downloading the iso you can "test drive" the OS before installing it to your Hard drive. If you Don't want Windows install over it. You can then create a virtual OS of Windows and use it when needed. You can also use a program called Wine. This allows Windows compatible software to be ran from Linux without needing a virtual. There's many options.
    Here's a link for Mint if your interested
    https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
     
  10. Turtleman

    Turtleman VIP Whale

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    Thanks Jackie. I haven't kept up with Linux over the past year and hadn't even heard of Mint. I just downloaded it, burned the ISO to DVD, and am "auditioning" on an old Pentium 4 machine. I'll have to play with it a lot more, but it could end up replacing Win 7, which doesn't do so well with a single core processor. Maybe I'll even try dual booting if I decide do an actual installation. (My main computer uses an AMD quad core running Win10.) Thanks again for the heads-up.
     
  11. Busyman

    Busyman VIP Whale

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  12. Turtleman

    Turtleman VIP Whale

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    A little feedback: after using Mint for a little while, mostly with Firefox, it's evident that everything is a lot more responsive than Windows 7 on the old Pentium processor. I have several more things to look at, but will either install it or try dual booting – having nothing to lose if it doesn't work out. Mint is, indeed, easy to use and a lot closer to Windows than Ubuntu. (I'm not even thinking of changing from Win 10 on my main machine, however.)
     
  13. Turtleman

    Turtleman VIP Whale

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    For update to my own post, I just installed Linux Mint alongside Windows 7 on my old clunker machine and it couldn't have been easier. Do I know how to have fun on a Sunday or what! :)