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Cooking Pans : Cast iron vs. seasoned steel

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by JWBlue, Dec 1, 2013.

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  1. JWBlue

    JWBlue VIP Whale

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    I usually cook eggs in a non stick pan.

    Today I used a steel pan. It tasted so much better. What a difference. I can't believe I cooked using a non stick pan all these years. Disgusting. :vomit:

    I am going to buy a Lodge cast iron skillet or seasoned steel pan.

    http://www.lodgemfg.com/products

    Unfortunately, we have an electric range. A bunch of questions.

    > Which is better for cooking eggs, thin steaks, and ground beef?

    > How often does the pan need to be seasoned in the oven?

    > Can they be seasoned with a non fat butter like "I Can't Believe it is not Butter?" I am guessing the answer is no. What oil is best to use?

    > Are there better brands than Lodge?
     
  2. jamesxnj

    jamesxnj VIP Whale

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    :rolleyes2:Nice little infomercial there...
     
  3. mikenhe

    mikenhe VIP Whale

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    I have lodge and I like it.

    seasoning - flaxseed oil.. need to get the edilble stuff from a health store and season it 6 times... comes out brilliantly.

    I don't do eggs in it though - mainly used for stuff that's going from the stove top straight into the oven - or on the smoker.
     
  4. Keyser Soze

    Keyser Soze Low-Roller

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    I have 4 cast iron pans (4", 6", 10", 16").

    I seasoned them years ago (coated with olive oil, in oven 400 for about an 1.5 hrs).

    Clean them after each use with water only (never any type of detergent). Then light coating of olive oil.
     
  5. mikenhe

    mikenhe VIP Whale

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  6. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

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    I switched last Christmas when I got a Lodge skillet and medium sized skillet as gifts. Go on line (You Tube) for how to season your cookware. Do this even though the Lodge literature says you don't have to, it is still the way to go.

    Even though I use my Rachel Ray ceramic cookware (a gift to myself the previous year) for the bulk of my cooking, the cast iron has become my go to cook ware of choice. I even went out and bought the 12" skillet w/lid.

    You can do anything with cast iron and I do have an electric range. You get even heat and (caution!) it doesn't take much heat to get it going.

    You can get a beautiful, even, sear on your meat and then pop it straight into the oven to finish it off.

    You can do anything with them. I love them!
     
  7. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

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  8. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

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    We have a mix, depending on what we're doing, so cast, enameled cast, few nonstick, an antiquated copper beauty for sauces and our mainstay for years has been a heavy-duty grade of anodized steel. The latter are being replaced with multi-ply steel/alum over time, mostly for the ability to shove 'em in a dishwasher.

    Not seeing how an undisturbed nonstick surface would have lesser "taste" than steel. Though I think you say you eat "healthy," blue, could it be you had to use some fat in the new stuff? That would improve the flavor.
     
  9. OntheStrip

    OntheStrip Tourist

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    Cast iron for meats, stews or similar. No-stick for eggs, and pancakes/crepes and stainless steel for most other things.

    A good nonstick is great for eggs. I have one that that I don't allow to be used for anything else. You won't get the same caramelization with a non-stick pan as you will a regular pan, but I like how easy it is for cooking sunny-side eggs.
     
  10. JWBlue

    JWBlue VIP Whale

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    Chemical taste from Teflon. I have strong taste buds.

    Before I cooked in a stainless steel pan I didn't know any better.


    Good link.


    I came across some good information people might want to read.

    http://wellnessmama.com/2193/
     
  11. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

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    Teflon? I'm talking nonstick. Two aren't necessarily the same. Is Teflon still made? Scary when that crap gets all scratched up.

    But the point remains, different stuff for different needs, and know your techniques. Very easy to do something with eggs in steel.
     
  12. Jimbo338

    Jimbo338 VIP Whale

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    I flea market and started buying old cast iron pans, cleaning them completely, removing all rust and seasoning them. I even started cooking with one myself. Lodge pans are the only company in the US now manufacturing cast iron, and is the best of the cast iron of today. But if you have an old pan from grandpa's day it will be a much better choice when cleaned up and reseasoned. I am cooking with an early Griswold, series 6 made between 1905 and 1907. It is amazing. Collectors are after mostly Griswold or Wagner in that order but they also sold many unmarked pans of equal quality that cooked as well and sold cheaper in the 5-10 cent stores and even Sears and Montgomery Wards (Wardware). I am timing out on pughlic computer.

    Jimbo338
     
  13. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

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    Use kosher salt to clean out an old pan or to start over with new seasoning.
     
  14. Jimbo338

    Jimbo338 VIP Whale

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    There are a lot of ways to renew the worst old pan you can find. I think the easiest way is this.
    1. Place the pan in the oven and run it through the self-cleaning cycle for an hour.
    2. When cool enough remove the pan from the oven and clean off the ash with a wire brush. If rusty use a wire brush and or a wire brush in an electric drill.
    3. soak the pan in a white vinegar solution for an hour or so. One part white vinegar to 3 parts water.
    4. Wear rubber gloves and remove pan and scout with a brillo pad or steel wood with lots of liquid soap rinse with hot water.
    5. dry with towel and it should look battleship gray as it did when made.
    6. coat with vegetable oil and heat to 200 degrees for an hour.
    7. coat again and bake at 400 for 3-4 hours.
    Now you have a seasoned pan.

    Very old pans, post civil war to late 1800's were thinner and lighter and made of a better grade of steel. Then they got heavier. Most American pans were milled to give them a smooth surface inside. Some Taiwan and Korean pans were milled as well. They are generally marked with origin and are much lighter than American pans. New Lodge are heavier still and as I mentioned before are the only ones still made in the USA.

    Jimbo338
     
  15. jgates8

    jgates8 VIP Whale

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    My hubby has about a 50 year old one sitting on our stove. All he does is yell at me to never wash it in the sink lol. He loves to cook bacon & then eggs in the bacon grease in it.
     
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