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Comp Hustling?

Discussion in 'Comps' started by OhioGuy, Oct 20, 2013.

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  1. OhioGuy

    OhioGuy Tourist

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    Watched an old show on Las Vegas and Max Rubin was talking about getting a ton of comps. Then I looked online and it seems most of the discussions on the large comps for low rollers took place years ago. So have things changed dramatically for some of these comp stratagies?

    If not which ones do you still use? Raising the bets when the pit boss is there, frequent breaks, something else?

    Thanks in advance for the info
     
  2. paperposter

    paperposter VIP Whale

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    there preety hip to most now.

    taking a break theve caught onto, raising bets they will ask the dealer what your avarage was .

    pocketing chips so theres a loose they figured that out also.


    there hip at this point.

    your best way is to be friends and play with the same xdealers and pit bossses so you actualy get a good avarage or a bump up or take a few minute break and they wont care.

    ps tipping doesnt hurt
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013
  3. nostresshere

    nostresshere Mr. Anti Debit Card

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    Not knowing what "strategies" were discussed/revealed, it is difficult to answer the question. But, I would guess most are no longer available.
     
  4. Nittany1

    Nittany1 VIP Whale

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    I read the book years ago and most of the info is pretty dated today.
    Some of his strategies may apply today in small casinos off the beaten path or where the staff is new.
    It was an interesting read from a historical perspective seeing how the comp game was played back then
     
  5. TIMSPEED

    TIMSPEED !địt mẹ!

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    The best thing I can say is...
    Figure out the specific comp system your after (via forums, newsgroups, word-of-mouth), then learn how to exploit said system, and away you go...
    Its not hard if you learn the ins&outs
    As others have said, it pays to make friends and tip...
     
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  6. Grid

    Grid VIP Whale

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    When i used to play Caribbean Stud all the time I would tip pretty well. The casino had a decent edge in odds over me on this carnival game but its fun. By over tipping, sometimes when the dealers shift is over, or when the pit critter would ask what my action was they would say I've been playing for 2 hours, when its really one, or playing about $50.00 a hand when its really $30. So it has worked in the past. I'm sure I tipped back what I earned in extra comps in the end.
     
  7. MarcRV

    MarcRV Tourist

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    Taking Breaks

    Taking breaks still works in a way. If you take frequent breaks to the point where it doesn't look normal the dealer will likely say something to the pit boss.

    However, walking back from a restroom trip instead of running is a way to slow down the pace of play.

    As others have said enjoy yourself and be nice. Being nice goes a long way with casino staff. Tips help too. :)
     
  8. Kickin

    Kickin Flea

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    Right, the idea of tipping extra to try and get a higher rating and therefore more comps doesn't make much sense. Especially at lower limits. On a game like BJ your hourly comp rate works out to around 30% of your average bet. So even if the PB doubled your rating from $50 to $100 you're talking about an extra $15/hr in comps. If you tipped an extra amount that was enough to get your rating doubled it was probably much more than $15/hr. Plus what does "extra comps" really mean in dollar terms anyway?

    This isn't in any way to suggest not to tip, but just that tipping extra for comps is likely a losing proposition.
     
  9. casinoboy

    casinoboy Low-Roller

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    make your first bet when the pit boss is watching a big bet,thats what they use for your average most of the time.

    if you want to take a break for the bathroom dont do it after you color up, go to the bathroom and then go back and color up.
     
  10. 44inarow

    44inarow VIP Whale

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    Of course, what constitutes "normal" can vary quite a bit... when it's late enough and the cocktails have been flowing, those trips can become pretty frequent without any strategy necessary!
     
  11. JustNgo

    JustNgo Low-Roller

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    Damn, the pit bosses must be on to me. At MB, the pit boss in the Lotus Room directed me to the high limit restroom instead of to the one across the floor near the cage. Must be telling me to cut back on my travel time LOL
     
  12. SBTX

    SBTX Tourist

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    LOL! Same thing happened to me last June. I almost got lost in the HL room :drunk:
     
  13. LandryBalla9

    LandryBalla9 High-Roller

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    This post is a it dated but I think the best strategy (which a few posters said piecemeal and works for me frequently) is: generate repoire with the same pit boss/floor manager by consistently playing within that pit area, tip the same couple dealers a fair amount when you are drawing blackjack (assuming you play it), be self deprecating when you're up and do not act like you're a big spender even if you are- as these dealers and floor staff have seen it all all and won't be impressed, act like your always down a bit even if you're not as human pity could perhaps lead a PB to raise your avg bet and thus your ADT, and just have a good time- a good personality radiates to the table and dealer and those kinds of people will find theirselves more welcome in a litany of ways (including better comps).
     
  14. jdvegas

    jdvegas VIP Whale

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    There are lots of other threads where the behavior and etiquette (good, bad, ugly) of casino visitors are discussed.

    Putting aside any consideration of comps, your advice on how to behave while table gambling is great for everyone at all times!

    :beer:
     
  15. Vladimir

    Vladimir Low-Roller

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    I've found trying to gauge what the pitbosses political views are can help to get a few additional comps (buffet etc). Usually a fairly good bet is to rant about Obamacare when the pitboss is in earshot.
     
  16. LandryBalla9

    LandryBalla9 High-Roller

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    Unless they're unionized and in that event, many are likely to support that legislation- Sorry, I work on Capitol Hill and had to comment on that lol. (Remember Nevada elected Reid again notwithstanding his hugely unappealing platform everywhere except for VEGAS)

    But I digress
     
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