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Asian Lady Pro Golfers

Discussion in 'Non-Vegas Chat' started by Breeze147, Jul 9, 2015.

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  1. Breeze147

    Breeze147 Button Man

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    Asians dominate Ladies Pro Golf and collegiate golf as well.

    Is there a reason for this? I think it may be increased opportunities, but then why would there not be a corresponding rise in Black female golfers?

    Why are these teens and young ladies so damn good?

    Mods, if this fails the PC test, then delete it. I mean no harm.
     
  2. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

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    Black opportunities or the lack thereof would be an American thing.

    As for the dominance, it's across Asia but is predominantly coming from South Korea (and Koreans residing/naturalized elsewhere, like Lydia Ko). Opportunity -- plus the lack of other opportunities -- fewer other-sport diversions, a strong cultural ethos of drive and family, and don't underestimate the influence of role models, which in the case of Korea means one thing ... Se Ri Pak. The second bloc is Japanese. Though, again, we have Taiwan represented at the top, and some real up-and-comers from SE Asia. Wait until mainland China figures out its hate/love relationship with the game.

    I played with one-time world #1 Ai Miyazato in this year's Dinah Shore pro-am. She's a rock star back home. The gallery was sparse -- good thing, fewer targets for me -- and likely was outnumbered by Japanese reporters and videographers, many non-sports, capturing her every move. At a pro-am. Rock star, truly. So there is that, too.
     
  3. klawrey

    klawrey High-Roller

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    I think Ken hit the nail on the head with fewer diversions. I'd take it a step further than just other sports but to other things in general. Their cultural is truly based in a drive and family as Ken also mentioned so when they set their mind to something they will stop at nothing to achieve. Not to say Americans or other nationalities cannot do the same but the Asian cultures seem to be more driven in my experience.

    I lived just north of Orlando for a few years and was a member at a semi-private club in Lake Mary called Timacuan Golf Club. It was home to the Mike Bender Academy for years before moving to Magnolia Plantation. Mike is a top 100 teacher and instructor to Zach Johnson (whom I have met several times on the ranges at Timacuan and he is a pretty cool guy). Mike's academy was loaded with players of Asian decent, I'd venture to guess the 5 or 6 for every other nationality. Of the kids I saw out at the club on a regular basis there were a couple American kids that I would see daily but I cannot think of a day I didn't see Mike's Asian pupils, they worked their butts off to excel at the game. It was almost to the point that if you did not see one of them on a day you almost had to think "is everything alright?"

    Today's teenagers are distracted by life, technology, the opposite sex, school, etc but the focus and drive of the Asian culture seems keep them on the track for whatever they set their mind to as evidenced by my experiences at Timacuan. I wish I had the drive to work the way those kids did and it wouldn't hurt to have the family resources to provide top 100 instruction, club membership, money so they don't have to work, new equipment, etc.

    So ultimately, I think it is a cultural thing that they are that much more focused and driven.
     
  4. Electroguy563

    Electroguy563 Over-Fried Gambler

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    The above posters has nailed it. It's no secret that the Asian culture nurtures perseverance, hard work, and utmost commitment. It's been this way for centuries.

    They also have 100% support from their families as well. In spirit and also in finances.

    Other cultures are not as committed (Americans, for example) since the youth are easily distracted by other interests, many of them easier to master and be good at. Golf is very difficult to master and maintain the high level of proficiency required to stay on top.
     
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  5. makikiboy

    makikiboy VIP Whale

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    I agree with both of you. American teenagers have more diverse activities while in Korea and Japan many families try to "push" their kids into the sport so they can be another Se Ri Pak so you see a lot of them out on the ranges (even in Korea) practicing their game. They are treated like rock stars in their country, while in America the American pro golfers (esp women) are seldom treated as celebrities. Before Michelle Wie many people wouldn't have even known who the American women pro golfers were other than Nancy Lopez.

    As for black players, I think America offers more opportunities in other sports (football, baseball, basketball, etc.) so any talented players would probably excel in other sports that they would have a better chance of excelling at (way more fb, bb and baseball opportunities in high school, college and higher). Also note that many of those professional sports aren't available in Asia (like fb and basketball).
     
  6. runningonthehub

    runningonthehub Low-Roller

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    The lack of black female golfers has a lot to do with the lack of opportunity to play golf. If you go the schools in the inner city, you will find that many high schools do not offer many sports for females. You might find basketball offered. But, seldom anything else. There is no chance to play golf. If you go to the suburban schools that are better funded, you will find many more opportunities for young girls to play many more sports, i.e, golf, tennis. swimming, etc.
    Add to the fact that many young black females simply are not interested in playing a sport, especially golf.. They fail to see the opportunity to win an athletic scholarship and go on the college.
    It truly has a lot to do with cultural. Some cultures seek out success and challenge. So cultures simply do not do that.
    Too many times in black culture, there is nobody available to tell young women of the opportunities in life. If parents do not know, they cannot pass that knowledge on to their children.
    That old saying of--"when you know better, you do better" really is true.
     
  7. klawrey

    klawrey High-Roller

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    I know this is not the case at least in my urban area. I live outside of Flint, Michigan (yes that crime capital of the U.S. for a few years) and the last two standing city high school not only offer golf programs but other sports as well as required by Title IX and equally between the genders. While I understand golf may not be offered everywhere there are surely more than just basketball offered for the girls.

    I will agree among the African American culture golf I still just not as popular. They see the much more lucrative NFL and NBA contracts even though they are just as hard to obtain as a PGA Tour card. I would venture a guess that the lack of interest is more of a factor than lack of opportunity.
     
  8. ken2v

    ken2v This Space For Rent

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    Lack of opportunity, cultural relevance, costs, the fixed nature of the game's playing grounds ... we finally have a guy on the PGA Tour who came up through the First Tee, which while not intended to be a golf-training conduit nonetheless is probably the #1 way kids who'd not otherwise find the game found the game. (He's white, btw.)
     
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